The Southern Literary Journal

A peer-reviewed journal of scholarly articles on literature. Published biannually by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of English.

Articles from Vol. 12, No. 2, Spring

Faulkner's Mosquitoes: Toward a Self-Image of the Artist
Through his first three novels William Faulkner was developing the technical skills necessary for his major fiction as well as working through a set of post-adolescent conflicts troubling him since 1918. Behind Soldiers' Pay lie his fixation on the...
Harry Crews: Man's Search for Perfection
With the recent widely heralded publication of his autobiography, A Childhood, Harry Crews has attained a prominence which should lead to serious consideration of his previous work in fiction. Though frequently and for the most part respectfully reviewed,...
Ike McCaslin: Traumatized in a Hawthornian Wilderness
While the earliest critical estimates of "The Bear" tended to canonize Ike, more recent criticism has viewed him--and in particular his act of repudiation in Part Four--with increasing distance and irony. Readings which either ignored the problems...
Index: Volumes I-XII (1968-1980)
INDEX Volumes I-XII (1968-1980) A cumulative index for Volumes XIII-XVIII will appear in the Spring issue of 1985. ESSAYS Vol., No. Page Absalom, Absalom!: Story-Telling as a Mode of Transcendence...
Miscellany from the Lumber Room
"I am quite sure that I have no feeling for short stories; that I shall never be able to write them, yet for some strange reason I continue to do so, and to try them on Scribner's with unflagging optimism" wrote William Faulkner to Afred Dashiell in...
Realism and Romance in Simms's Midcentury Fiction
The intermingled artistic traditions that mark Simms's mature writing spring largely from conditions in his literary milieu. (1) The years in which he wrote (roughly 1825-1870) saw the triumph and then the decline of the historical romance that he...
Robert Penn Warren the Novelist, Now (and Then)
Over the last decade, belated or compensatory testimonials to the magnitude of Robert Penn Warren's long-term accomplishment as a poet have become standard critical fare, even--or particularly--among reviewers of his novels, most recently of his tenth,...
Shifty in a New Country: Games in Southwestern Humor
Writing a half-century ago, Dorothy Dondore remarked on the similarities between the heroic age of Europe and the frontier period in America: The existence of a dominantly masculine society, primitively simple in its standards; contempt for...
Southern Humor and Sentimentality-Circa 1900
The more than seventy years separating a reader today from Alice Hegan Rice's Mrs. Wiggs of the Cabbage Patch (1901), and Frances Boyd Calhoun's Miss Minerva and William Green Hill (1909), have changed the South and that reader to such an extent that...
The Antebellum South as a Symbol of Mind
Drew Faust's A Sacred Circle: The Dilemma of the Intellectual in the Old South, 1840-1860 is the most important inquiry into the mind of the antebellum South since William R. Taylor's Cavalier and Yankee: The Old South and American National Character....
"The Human Comes before Art": Flannery O'Connor Viewed through Her Letters and Her Critics
Letter writing mattered a great deal to Flannery O'Connor, especially in the period from early 1951 until her death in August 1964--when lupus gave her life a decisive sedentary turn. She explained her special circumstances in a letter written to a...
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