The Southern Literary Journal

A peer-reviewed journal of scholarly articles on literature. Published biannually by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of English.

Articles from Vol. 42, No. 1, Fall

Disturbing the African American Community: Defamiliarization in Randall Kenan's "Let the Dead Bury Their Dead"
Signifying on diverse black, white, and Hispanic writers, Randall Kenan creates in his fiction a world of belief, disbelief, tragedy, and triumph, which establishes for his characters a sense of what it means to live. (1) In his fictional central community...
My Son, My Son!: Paternalism, Haiti, and Early Twentieth-Century American Imperialism in William Faulkner's Absalom, Absalom!
Over the last ten years critics have focused increasingly on the role of the Caribbean in William Faulkner's fiction. According to John T. Matthews, this recent interest in the West Indian component of Faulkner's works has served to uncover long-neglected...
Poe and the Cogito
With his famous theorem, Cogito, ergo sum, Rene Descartes initiated a modern conception of individual consciousness that signaled the divorcing of mind from a physical world that was now comprehended only by way of a method of doubt. In its dualistic...
Southern Expressionism: Apocalyptic Hillscapes, Racial Panoramas, and Lustmord in William Faulkner's Light in August
Joe Christmas, after walking through Light in August's Jefferson and Freedman Town, comes to view these segregated communities as one panorama for the first time from a hilltop overlooking Jefferson's industrial district, just hours before descending...
The Chiasmic Embrace of the Natural World in Eudora Welty's "Delta Wedding"
In southern literature, interactions with the land have often defined the people themselves. Although Eudora Welty's Delta Wedding has been labeled as a southern pastoral, the natural world in the novel doesn't operate solely on a symbolic level; the...
Velvet Coats and Manicured Nails: The Body Speaks Resistance in "Dust Tracks on a Road"
Zora Neale Hurston's supposed opposition to making race politics an integral part of her texts has caused critics and literary figures from her time to the present to brand her as a race traitor and a sellout. Richard Wright condemned Hurston's writing...
William Faulkner and the Ledgers of History
Recently I interviewed Dr. Edgar Wiggin Francisco III, whose father, Edgar Francisco, Jr., was a friend of William Faulkner. As a boy, Edgar III was present and listening when Faulkner made frequent trips to Holly Springs, Mississippi, to visit the McCarroll/Francisco...
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