The Southern Literary Journal

A peer-reviewed journal of scholarly articles on literature. Published biannually by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of English.

Articles from Vol. 33, No. 1, Fall

Archetypal Symbolism in Alice Walker's Possessing the Secret of Joy
Alice Walker's fifth novel, Possessing the Secret of joy (1992), marks a new beginning for an author/activist who explicitly appropriates Carl Jung's archetypal patterns of the ego, the shadow, the anima/animus, and the Self in a psychological process...
Articulation and Artistry: A Conversational Analysis of the Awakening
In Kate Chopin's The Awakening, the ways in which the protagonist, Edna Pontellier, articulates her feelings about her social position indicate that access to discourse is an important issue to consider in determining the causes of Edna's conflict....
Balzacian Evolution and the Origin of the Snopeses
Malcolm Cowley's short essay "William Faulkner's Human Comedy"(1) probably created the Honore de Balzac-William Faulkner source study field by briefly suggesting organizational similarities between La Comedie humaine and Faulkner's oeuvre. After Cowley,...
"Erasing Angel": The Lucifer-Trickster Figure in Flannery O'Connor's Short Fiction
"A dimension taken away is one thing; a dimension added is another." --Flannery O'Connor, "The Fiction Writer and His Country" "The origins, liveliness, and durability of cultures," writes cultural historian Lewis Hyde, "require that there be...
Hopeful Grief: The Prospect of a Postmodernist Feminism in Allison's Bastard out of Carolina
Dorothy Allison's Bastard Out of Carolina is a lyrical yet fiercely disturbing portrait of a South Carolina family besieged by poverty, violence, and incest. Narrated by young Ruth Anne Boatwright--or Bone as she is called by her family--the novel...
Lee Smith and the Bronte Sisters
Early in her recent book Lee Smith, Dorothy Combs Hill names Eudora Welty, Flannery O'Connor, Elizabeth Spencer, Katherine Anne Porter, and Virginia Woolf as among the early inspirations who taught Smith that she "could write out of female experience"...
"Peeping Toms on History": Barry Hannah's Never Die as Postmodern Western
In his thoughtful essay "Home by Way of California: The Southerner as the Last European," Lewis P. Simpson explores what seem to him basic differences between the mind of the South and its western "other." The latter, contends Simpson, has corollaries...
Resurrecting Thomas Wolfe
When Thomas Wolfe died of tubercular meningitis on September 15, 1938, his literary reputation was equal in the United States to that of Faulkner, Hemingway, and Fitzgerald. In the sixty plus years since, his artistic reputation has been all but destroyed....
Swimming Free of the Matriarchy: Sexual Baptism and Feminine Individuality in Eudora Welty's the Golden Apples
Critics have often commented upon the strong feminist and sexual implications of Eudora Welty's story-cycle The Golden Apples. Patricia Yaeger calls The Golden Apples "a beautifully crafted and gender-preoccupied novel whose emphasis on sexuality ......
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