The Southern Literary Journal

A peer-reviewed journal of scholarly articles on literature. Published biannually by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of English.

Articles from Vol. 23, No. 1, Fall

Editorial Note
This issue of the Southern Literary Journal seems heavily weighted with essays 1) about prose fiction, 2) about white authors, and 3) about material written in the second half of the twentieth century. Such is hardly a bias on the part of the editors--we...
Eudora Welty and the Fairy Tale
Fairy tales are among the oldest of stories found in Western literature. They are also among the most widely interpreted of literary texts, having caught the attention of, among others, folklorists and historical, sociological, psychoanalytic, and...
Oral History: The Enchanted Circle of Narrative and Dream
"Tell me your dreams," Roy says to Sally at the end of the narrative body of Oral History (1). Though a joking reference to the second Almarine's Amway sales pitch, Roy's request highlights the orientation of the entire novel. Dreams, not so much the...
The Confessions of an Ex-Suicide: Relenting and Recovering in Richard Ford's the Sportswriter
We think of the key, each in his prison Thinking of the key, each confirms a prison --T.S. Eliot, The Wasteland To be is just as great as to perceive or tell. --Walt Whitman, Preface to Leaves of Grass Richard Ford is onto something. In...
The Poem as Con Game: Dual Satire and the Three Levels of Narrative in Ebenezer Cooke's "The Sot-Weed Factor"
The late seventeenth century and early eighteenth century was a time of heavy trade between England and her American colonies, and much of this trade focused on the highly profitable tobacco crop which was grown in America and then sold by English...
The Reach of Fiction: Narrative Technique in Styron's Sophie's Choice
In Sophie's Choice, the telling of the tale is contrived to display the capacity of fiction to illuminate a subject that baffles ordinary inquiry and to test the claims of art against perhaps the extreme form of knowledge: the meaning of Auschwitz....
The Shape of Love: The Motif of Sacrifice in Two Novels by John Ehle
In his essay "Humane Literacy," George Steiner contends that "Literature deals essentially and continually with the image of man, with the shape and motive of human conduct" (4). According to Steiner, critics of contemporary literature have a responsibility...
Through a Lens Darkly: T. S. Stribling's Representation of the Past in His Alabama Trilogy
A pathbreaker for what is popularly known as the Southern Literary Renascence, T. S. Stribling is chiefly remembered today for his trilogy of the 1930s--The Forge, The Store, and Unfinished Cathedral--a work focusing on three successive generations...
Walker Percy, 1916-1990
The death of Walker Percy deprives us of one of the genuinely original voices in that galaxy of literary talent that we know as modern Southern literature. Walker began his career as a novelist comparatively late he was in his mid-40s when The Moviegoer...
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