The Southern Literary Journal

A peer-reviewed journal of scholarly articles on literature. Published biannually by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of English.

Articles from Vol. 29, No. 2, Spring

Disabling History: Contemporary Southern Literature's Solution
It's damn terrible the way the human race don't know how to act around somebody that ain't the average talking Joe.... I figured it out pretty much: Thousands of years ago they had to kill people that was screwed up, so now some of that instinct is...
Emerson Dines on Bear; or the Eradication of Nature in Faulkner's South
For Faulkner, history always overpowers nature. For Emerson, history is nature. In the above you have the vast gulf between Old World and New, between European artist and American writer, between Deep South lyricist and New England hypervisualist....
From Mules to Muliebrity: Speech and Silence in Their Eyes Were Watching God
Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God is a text richly endowed with meaning and purpose which uses poetic language and folkloric imagery to convey its messages. One recurrent symbol throughout the first half of the novel is that of the...
Gender and Secession in Simms's Katharine Walton
Unlike some previous studies that have minimized the political implications of Simms's fiction, Charles S. Watson's From Nationalism to Secessionism: The Changing Fiction of William Gilmore Simms traces Simms's political ideas as reflected in his literary...
James Dickey, 1923-1997
The death of James Dickey brings quietus to one of the most frolicsome and gifted figures on the literary scene. There are writers--Robert Penn Warren is an example, and Peter Taylor--who make their personalities known mainly through their work, and...
Les Cenelles and Quadroon Balls: "Hidden Transcripts" of Resistance and Domination in New Orleans, 1803-1845
Si j'allais, me jouant de prejuges du monde, Lui dire: "Femme! il faut a ma douleur profonde Les soupirs de ton coeur" `What if I went, casting off the chains of the elite, To say to her: "Woman! my profound woes must have The sighs...
Needing to Talk: Language and Being in Losing Battles
"Maybe nothing ever happens once and is finished," observes Quentin Compson famously in Absalom, Absalom! Maybe happen is never once but like ripples maybe on water after the pebble sinks, the ripples moving on spreading, the pool attached by...
Road Stories That Stay Home: Car and Driver in Appalachia and the Stories of Breece D'J Pancake
What! Ruins already? --Alexis de Tocqueville From this remark by Tocqueville upon seeing the remains of an abandoned hearth in 1830s New England to Frederick Jackson Turner's 1893 frontier thesis, a seemingly reasonable rough consensus emerged...
Robert Penn Warren, the Reader, and the Reconciliation of Opposites in "The Ballad of Billie Potts," Brother to Dragons, and Audubon
"The Ballad of Billie Potts," Brother to Dragons, and Audubon are key works in Robert Penn Warren's poetic oeuvre. These three long, historical poems are among Warren's best and mark distinctive moments in his career. (1) Appearing in Selected Poems,...
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