The Southern Literary Journal

A peer-reviewed journal of scholarly articles on literature. Published biannually by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of English.

Articles from Vol. 47, No. 1, Fall

Bearing the Burden of Loss: Melancholic Agency in Charles W. Chesnutt's Paul Marchand, FMC
Although a number of scholars have focused on the titular protagonist in analyzing the arbitrary constructions of race and the performances of racial identities (1) in Charles W. Chesnutt's Paul Marchand, FMC, few have fully explored the ways in which...
"Covered in Blood and Dirt": Industrial, Capital, and Cultural Crisis in Red Rock and Dracula
Karl Marx, who was tremendously fond of the vampire as metaphor, famously wrote, "If money, according to [Marie] Augier, 'comes into the world with a congenital blood-stain on one cheek,' capital comes dripping from head to foot, from every pore, with...
"I'm Afraid I've Got Involved with a Nut": New Faulkner Letters
When I was working in the Random House archives at Columbia Rare Book & Manuscript Library in New York, I discovered a series of letters exchanged among William Faulkner, his editor Robert Haas, and a young aspiring writer James Culpepper. These...
No Happy Loves: Desire, Nostalgia, and Failure in Margaret Mitchell's Gone with the Wind
In Love in the Western World, Denis de Rougemont claims that "happy love has no history" (15). This essay seeks to explore the converse: why do fictional portrayals of history seem to include no happy loves? Writing about the past and seeking to retrieve...
North to the Future: Captivity and Escape in the Member of the Wedding
The youthful desire to escape has played a central role in American literature with novels such as The Catcher in the Rye and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn depicting flights from the constraints of civilized society. While the captivity tropes in...
Reconstruction
As I write this note, I want to acknowledge the passing of one of the field's most inspired and influential scholars: Patricia (Patsy) Yaeger, author of Dirt and Desire: Reconstructing Southern Women's Writings, 1930-1990. Sometime in the near future,...
Storm Warnings: The Eternally Recurring Apocalypse in Kate Chopin's the Awakening
A characteristic of literary naturalism is the representation of "limitations placed on the human will" (Pizer 5), and while naturalistic readings of Kate Chopins The Awakening (1899) have recognized the way that social and biological forces circumscribe...
"The Bounty of Providence": Food and Identity in William Byrd's the History of the Dividing Line
William Byrd II's writings have provided useful insights into the complicated realities of transatlantic life for one wealthy eighteenth-century American. Byrd, born in Virginia to a newly wealthy emigrant father, typified the transatlantic gentleman;...
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