State Legislatures

This magazine covers policy and politics through articles on trends, legislative in the United States, best practices, the legislative process and institution and leadership and federal initiatives that affect the states.

Articles from Vol. 36, No. 8, September

As They See It
"You wouldn't say your cardiologist should have six years or less of experience." --Michigan Senator Gretchen Whitmer on term limits, in Stateline.org. [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] "We're down to a point where there's not any fluff left in the budget."...
Balancing Act: An Education Historian Argues That Too Much Focus on Testing May Send Schools on a Race to the Bottom
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Diane Ravitch must like to swim upstream. The education historian and prolific author does not take the easy route when it comes to the sharp elbows debate about the right path to reform the nation's schools. Ravitch was...
Digging for Dimes-In Rest Stops, Bull Semen and Tacos
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] The steep drop in state revenues appears to be subsiding, but lawmakers still face the difficult task of closing state budget gaps. In the past year, they have considered and adopted budget-cutting measures ranging from across-the-board...
Get REAL: There Is Still Resistance to Federally Required Secure Driver's Licenses, but Most States Are on the Road to Compliance
Congress and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security spent much of last year playing a game of chicken. In the end, DHS blinked. The department hoped Congress would pass modifications to the REAL ID law, which calls on states to strengthen security...
Lacklu$ter Lotterie$
In 1964, New Hampshire became the first state in recent history to create a lottery. Fast forward 44 years, and Arkansas becomes the latest state to adopt a lottery after voters approved a ballot question amending the state constitution in November...
Smooth as a Flat Rock: The Kentucky Senator Has Seen Bluegrass Politics from the Statehouse to the Governor's Mansion and Back Again
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] When Kentucky Governor William Goebel was shot to death in 1900--the only American governor ever assassinated while in office be was succeeded by Lieutenant Governor J.C.W. Beckham. As lieutenant governor, Beckham was also...
The [A.Sup.+] Teacher: Deciding Who Is Effective in the Classroom Is Not as Easy as It Seems
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Effectiveness. Decades of debate over how to improve schools and student achievement boils down to that word. It seems simple enough. Teachers and principals who can help students do better in school and are effective...
The Common Good? the Debate over Common Core Standards for K-12 Education Is Heating Up
As he contemplates the move to create common core standards across the country, Texas Representative Rob Eissler has advice for his fellow legislators in the other 49 states. "I think Nancy Reagan said it best a while back," says Eissler, referring...
The Work Ahead: Massachusetts Senator Richard Moore Assumed the Presidency of the National Conference of State Legislatures in July and Spoke with State Legislatures about His Plans
STATE LEGISLATURES: What are the key elements of the states' agenda in Congress in the coming year? SENATOR RICHARD MOORE: The issue that could have the most far-reaching effect on states and local governments will be the federal deficit and the...
Vote-by-Mail Expands
As election officials are being asked to do more with less, states are expanding the use of all-mail balloting for local elections to eliminate polling place costs. In 1998, Oregonians passed an initiative requiring all elections be conducted by...