Studies in Short Fiction

Scholarly journal covers American and British fiction, short stories, and narrative poems through critical essays and book reviews.

Articles from Vol. 36, No. 4, Fall

"Bad Breath": Gerald Vizenor's Lacanian Fable
Gerald Vizenor, suggests Louis Owens, is both the most traditional and the least traditional of the Native American authors writing today (Owens, "Ecstatic" 143). An enrolled member of the Minnesota Chippewa tribe from the White Earth Reservation,...
"Brightness Falls": Magic in the Short Stories of Mary Butts
Our spiritual consciousness acts through the will and its instruments upon material objects, in order to produce changes which will result in the establishment of the new conditions of consciousness which we wish. This is the definition of...
"Inextricable Disordered Ranges": Mary Austin's Ecofeminist Explorations in Lost Borders
Although Mary Austin has generally come to be perceived as a writer who, as Patrick Murphy summarizes, "gives primacy to nature as a dynamic interactive system in which people can participate if they follow the lead of the land" (67), recent critical...
"Loyal Saints or Devious Rascals": Domestic Servants in Edith Wharton's Stories "The Lady's Maid's Bell" and "All Souls'". (Articles)
Critic Andrew Levy points out the importance of the indoors for Wharton: "Indoor metaphors were a leitmotif in her letters, essays, and fiction, and her books on garden architecture and home decor were among her most gratifying labors" (58). Considering...
Memorials and Monuments: Historical Method and the (Re)construction of Memory in F. Scott Fitzgerald's "The Ice Palace"
All schemes of morality are nothing more than efforts to put into permanent codes the expedients found useful by some given race. --H. L. Mencken, The Philosophy of Nietzsche (ix) 1 Poor Fitzgerald--forever ensconced in the halls of academe...
Mythmaking and the Consequence of "Soul History" in Jim Harrison's Legends of the Fall
O History, as Carl Becker remarked, how many truths are committed in thy name! But there is no cynicism in this observation as long as it means that the course of events, like a moving train, provides new positions from which to survey the...
Pedagogy of the Undressed: Sherwood Anderson's Kate Swift
Sherwood Anderson idealizes Kate Swift as "a tiny goddess on a pedestal" (160) (1) yet seemingly discards her once she has served her purpose. Critics tend to conclude that Anderson fails his female characters; Marilyn Judith Atlas points out that...

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