Studies in the Novel

An international literary quarterly that publishes literary criticism and scholarship on the novel. Includes essays on well-known and lesser-known novelists of all periods and countries. Contents include essays, reviews of recent books on novels and novel

Articles from Vol. 36, No. 1, Spring

"All She Knew Was, That She Wished to Live": Late-Victorian Realism, Liberal-Feminist Ideals, and George Gissing's in the Year of the Jubilee
Toward the beginning of In the Year of the Jubilee, George Gissing's 1894 novel about a young, middle-class woman who struggles with her identity in a non-traditional marriage, the narrator draws for his readers a picture of the heroine, Nancy Lord....
Falling in Public: Larsen's Passing, McCarthy's the Group, and Baldwin's Another Country
There remained only the window, the large Bloomsbury-lodging house window, the tiresome, the troublesome, and rather melodramatic business of opening the window and throwing himself out. It was their idea of tragedy, not his. --Virginia Woolf, Mrs....
Iris Murdoch and the Case of "Too Many Men"
In The Flight from the Enchanter (1956), Rosa Keep makes several efforts to save the Artemis, a women's periodical founded by her dead mother and Mrs. Camilla Wingfield. One such effort involves visiting Mrs. Wingfield, an eighty-three year old suffragette,...
"Reading Coolly" in John Marchmont's Legacy: Reconsidering M. E. Braddon's Legacy
In her 1863 novel John Marchmont's Legacy, Mary Elizabeth Braddon represents a humorously reflexive scene. Two young women, both avid readers, sit at a breakfast table with the hero Edward Arundel. Belinda Lawford, who is secretly in love with Edward,...
The Genealogy of the Literary Bildungsroman: Edward Bulwerlytton and W. M. Thackeray
In many critical accounts of the Bildungsroman, and especially those that consider its genealogy within late-eighteenth- and nineteenth-century literary history, questions of time are of the essence. From Mikhail Bakhtin's exposition of the "profoundly...
The Modern Tragedy of Blithedale
Curiously enough, one cannot read a book: one can only reread it. -Vladimir Nabokov Lectures on Literature (3) Few books seem better designed to test the accuracy of Nabokov's assertion than does that most modern and elusive of Nathaniel Hawthorne...