Studies in the Novel

An international literary quarterly that publishes literary criticism and scholarship on the novel. Includes essays on well-known and lesser-known novelists of all periods and countries. Contents include essays, reviews of recent books on novels and novel

Articles from Vol. 32, No. 2, Summer

Courting Death: Necrophilia in Samuel Richardson's Clarissa
Though the psychological parallelism between Lovelace and Clarissa has been previously examined, their analogous sexual identifications have received only brief attention. From Clarissa's threats of suicide and Lovelace's anesthetized rape of her,...
D. H. Lawrence: Pleasure and Death
D. H. Lawrence was a virtual textbook embodiment of Freud's theories about the pleasure principle and the death instinct. Focusing on acultural determinism, Freud viewed destructiveness and the pleasure principle as equally fundamental to the "vacillating...
Frames of Female Suicide
"Destruction with destruction to destroy." John Milton, Paradise Lost, 10.1000 Suicide is a scandal. It ruptures the social order and defies sovereign power over life and death. In 1670 the French criminal code therefore assimilates homicide de...
Introduction
In spite of examining novels ranging across some 280 years and a number of disparate cultures, the essays in this collection reveal that authors represent death as a means to explore the cultural, psychic, and political deployment of power. Death functions...
Posthumous Posturing: The Subversive Power of Death in Contemporary Women's Fiction
Roland Barthes' oft-quoted assertion that "narrative is present in every age, in every place, in every society," that it "is simply there like life itself ... international, transhistorical, transcultural"(1) has devastating implications when taken...
"Taught by Death What Life Should Be": Elizabeth Gaskell's Representation of Death in North and South
Literature in the nineteenth century was a discourse in which the representation of death was enormously popular. One need only remember that Dickens's The Old Curiosity Shop (1840-1841), in which we read about little Nell's death, sold 100,000 copies...
The Feminist Abject: Death and the Constitution of Theory
The corpse (or cadaver: cadere, to fall), that which has irremediably come a cropper, is cesspool, and death; it upsets even more violently the one who confronts it as fragile and fallacious chance. --Julia Kristeva, The Powers of Horror(1) When...
The Medical Gaze and the Female Corpse: Looking at Bodies in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein
In the nineteenth century, practices which involved looking at dead bodies were classified as potentially perverse. Observing the body and writing about it in meticulous detail became a hallmark of the era, as bodies on display in hospitals, morgues,...
"The Woman Shall Bear Her Iniquity":(1) Death as Social Discipline in Thomas Hardy's the Return of the Native
"How could there be any good in a woman everybody spoke ill of?"(2) In the most emotionally charged scene between husband and wife in Thomas Hardy's The Return of the Native, Clym Yeobright thus finally succumbs to the view of Eustacia Vye's identity...
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