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A journal focusing on literature and literary topics for the academic audience.

Articles from Vol. 28, No. 2, Summer

Direct Addresses, Narrative Authority, and Gender in Rebecca Harding Davis's "Life in the Iron Mills."
When Rebecca Harding Davis died in 1910, eulogies recounted how her most famous work, "Life in the Iron Mills," published in the Atlantic Monthly nearly fifty years earlier, defied nineteenth-century assumptions about women's writing. According to the...
Fanny's Fantasies: Class, Gender and the Unreliable Narrator in Cleland's Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure
John Cleland's chosen narrative voice in Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure, that of Fanny Hill, obviously invites the charge that he is constructing a female subjectivity which suits a male agenda.(1) Although this reading of the work is possible, there...
Final Curtain on the War: Figure and Ground in Virginia Woolf's between the Acts
"X I make this mark to show the point at which a bomb shook the window so violently that the pen jumped out of my hand. There's an air raid going on--" (Virginia Woolf, Letter to Hugh Walpole, 29 Sept. 1940, Letters 6:435) Virginia Woolf wrote Between...
Handing over Power in James's What Maisie Knew
Henry James's What Maisie Knew is, in Paul Theroux's felicitous phrase, "a novel of thrusting hands" (7). Many critics have observed the importance of the novel's extensive hand imagery, yet no one has done a systematic study of that imagery. The hidden...
Milton's Missing Rhymes
In his prefatory note on "The Verse," attached to the second edition of Paradise Lost, Milton first explains "why the Poem Rimes not" by an appeal to cultural authority, aligning himself with a Classical and epic tradition--"that of Homer in Greek and...
Reading Readers in Virginia Woolf's Orlando: A Biography
Reading Orlando: A Biography or, for that matter, any of Virginia Woolf's novels becomes a venture into uncertain terrain where the reader must sign on with the writer to discover the text's construction and thus a path, not necessarily an easy one,...
The Mutt and Jute Dialogue in Joyce's Finnegans Wake: Some Gricean Perspectives
Let us swop hats and excheck a few strong verbs weak oach eather yapyazzard abast the blooty creeks. (Finnegans Wake 16.8-9) 1. PERSPECTIVES ON GRICE It has been nearly twenty years since Mary Louise Pratt, in Toward a Speech Act Theory of Literary...
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