Style

A journal focusing on literature and literary topics for the academic audience.

Articles from Vol. 31, No. 1, Spring

Beyond 'The Brain of Katherine Mansfield': The Radical Potentials and Recuperations of Second-Person Narrative
In the concluding paragraph of a recent special issue in Style on the topic of second-person narrative fiction, Monika Fludernik takes a moment to insist that we acknowledge the complexity and diversity of second-person narration and suggests that its...
By Whose Authority? Point of View in the First Chapter of Harold Frederic's 'The Damnation of Theron Ware.'
One of the more beguiling aspects of Harold Frederic's The Damnation of Theron Ware is its power to draw readers into participating in its explorations of authority. In Fritz Oehlschlaeger's view, the novel "discredits" all of the available authority...
Douglas Hodge Reading Keats's Elgin Marbles Sonnet
This paper is part of a large-scale investigation of the nature of the rhythmical performance of poetry.(1) It uses the computer to analyze delivery instances of verse lines within the theoretical framework of the perception-oriented theory of meter,...
Hearing the Measures
The poets and the audiences of 1590 and 1600 were in love with the unrhymed pentameters. To us familiar; to them a Newfoundland. They ran riot with the discovery, as an age does when a new creative medium falls to its portion. They heard the beat with...
Roy Harris and Writing without Speech
"A language [langue] and its written form [ecriture]," wrote Ferdinand de Saussure in chapter 6 of his Cours de linguistique generale, "constitute two separate systems of signs. The sole reason for the existence of the latter is to represent the former....
Speaking Out: Dialogue and the Literary Unconscious
Freud's concept of the unconscious is the foundation of psychoanalysis, but it is also the primary obstacle to psychoanalytic literary criticism. The originality of Freud's method in The Interpretation of Dreams is to ask patients to free associate to...
"Strange Things I Have in Head, That Will to Hand": Echoes of Sound and Sense in Macbeth
Dramatic poetry begins in a sensuous apprehension through the ear. Coburn Freer (8) The renowned pianist Artur Schnabel, when asked what was "great" music, replied that great music is music that is "better than it can be performed." His remark seems...
"Terrible Simplicity": Emerson's Metaleptic Style
Emerson's Nature (1836) is electric, the "transparent eyeball" its shocking core.(1) What Longinus writes of sublime oratory is true of Nature's most rhetorically charged passage. The effect of the "eyeball" passage "is not persuasion but transport,"...
Ways of Personifying
Over the centuries, rhetoricians and critics have offered numerous definitions of personification, some inclusive, others restrictive. Since inclusive definitions tend to blur distinctions and restrictive ones to push aside problematic instances in their...
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