Teaching Children Mathematics

Teaching Children Mathematics is a monthly (August through May) journal published and owned by The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics whose headquarters are in Reston, Va. It has been published since 1994. Written for mathematics teachers, Teaching Children Mathematics covers mathematics education through the middle grades. This journal provides educators with teaching techniques for mathematics education and focuses on developments in curriculum, instruction, learning and teacher education. Its region is the United States. The February 2006 issue of Teaching Children Mathematics featured an article titled "How Many Days 'til My Birthday? Helping Students Understand Calendar Connections and Concepts." This article described a new approach to instructing kindergarteners about the representation of time through calendars. The October 2010 issue looked at building word problems by using students' own experiences. The journal's regular departments include "Math by the Month" and "From the Classroom." Pamela Halonen is the Editor and Gretchen Mui and Luanne Flom are Contributing Editors.

Articles from Vol. 7, No. 6, February

Developing Number Senses
What Can Other Cultures Tell Us? Linda Lai's third- and fourth-grade mathematics students in the Edith Bowen Lab School of Utah State University are studying a variety of counting systems used by people around the world and throughout time. Activity...
Elastic Geometry and Storyknifing: A Yup'ik Eskimo Example
On sunny days, when the tide ebbed low enough, we would walk along the soft, dry, grainy shoreline and along the eroded, grassy, willow embankments. We searched for claylike, grayish brown mud that stuck together like putty, more prominent on the edges...
Exploring the Game of "Julirde": A Mathematical-Educational Game Played by Fulbe Children in Cameroon
Mathematics develops dynamically. Each day, thousands of mathematical problems are solved and many more new problems are invented by people all over the world, from China to Brazil, from Australia to Canada, from Finland to South Africa. Mathematical...
Geometry through Beadwork Designs
The fifth-grade children eagerly picked out envelopes containing brightly colored, geometric shapes to begin making their Ute Indian beadwork designs. Each child had a strip of construction paper simulating a tanned hide, or buckskin, to decorate with...
How Big Was the Cat?
The goal of the "Problem Solvers" department is to foster improved communication among teachers by posing one problem each month for K--6 teachers to try with their students. Pose the problem, reflect on your students' work, analyze the classroom dialogue,...
Kenta, Kilts, and Kimonos: Exploring Cultures and Mathematics through Fabrics
Fabrics have always been a means of expressing cultural heritage. We can often identify different cultures and countries by the fabrics used in garments worn by their people. For example, garments made from kenta cloth, with its bold colors and designs,...
Mathematics and Culture
Mathematics is a vital aspect of culture. Mathematical principles may not in and of themselves be "cultural," but as soon as those principles are used by human beings, what is done becomes culturally influenced. Mathematics, therefore, is a reflection...
Mathematics Makes a World of Difference in Our Lives!
People everywhere use mathematics to solve problems and to share mathematical ideas and solutions. Mathematics occurs across all cultures in six aspects of human activity, which are counting, measuring, locating, designing, explaining, and playing...
On the Road with Cholo, Vato, and Pano
Typically, elementary school mathematics experiences for children in the United States have stood almost completely apart from their lives outside school. Children's voices simply do not come through in the common arithmetic-driven curriculum. Although...
People, Places, and Mathematics
Memo The "Math by the Month" activities are designed to appeal directly to students. Students may work on the activities individually or in small groups. No solutions are suggested so that students will look to themselves as the mathematical authority,...
Seeding Ethnomathematics with Oware: Sankofa
The word sankofa, as used by the Akan-speaking people of Ghana, is a grammatical imperative, meaning that to advance, one must reflect on and reclaim traditional cultural ideas. Reflecting on mathematical ideas expressed in cultural products and practices...
The International Study Group on Ethnomathematics
Students and teachers who are looking for multicultural approaches to mathematics will find a wealth of Web sites at the homepage for the International Study Group on Ethnomathematics (ISGEm). These links can be found at www.rpi.edu/[sim]eglash/isgem.dir/links.htm...
The Intersection of Two Unlikely Worlds: Ratios and Drums
When mathematics lessons are linked with personal experiences, typically, the result is that the student gains a stronger understanding of the content than if the lessons are isolated and unconnected. This premise was recently supported in a local...
What Is Ethnomathematics, and How Can It Help Children in Schools?
The term ethnomathematics is used to express the relationship between culture and mathematics. The term requires a dynamic interpretation because it describes concepts that are themselves neither rigid nor singular--namely, ethno and mathematics (D'Ambrosio...
What Values Do You Teach When You Teach Mathematics?
On the first day back after the winter holiday, you are visiting with your fourth-grade class before getting down to work. You ask whether anyone received any "mathematical" presents. One boy says that he was given a mathematics game from his uncle's...