Notes on Contemporary Literature

Articles from Vol. 37, No. 5, November

Barbara Kingsolver's the Poisonwood Bible and the Essentializing of Africa: A Critical Double Standard?
There are at least two practices and beliefs that Barbara Kingsolver inscribes in her novel, The Poisonwood Bible (NY: HarperFlamingo, 1998), onto the cultures of the Congo region, which in fact are probably borrowed from other parts of the African...
Implications of the the Incredible Shrinking Man Allusion in Don DeLillo's Americana
David Bell, the 28-year-old protagonist of Don DeLillo's first novel, Americana (1971), jokes that he has spent "28 years in the movies" (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1971: 224). He has not been involved in the cinematic industry as such, but his actual...
Salvific "Something" in Flannery O'Connor's "A Stroke of Good Fortune" and Edward Lewis Wallant's the Pawnbroker and Tenants of Moonbloom
Joyce C. Dyer has noted that "many authors have recognized the power and wonder of the ambiguous, uncertain term "something" ("'Something' in Flannery O'Connor's Wise Blood," Notes on Contemporary Literature [15.5]:7). In the fiction of Flannery...
"The Emperor of Ice-Cream" and the Florida Cigar Industry
At first sight the "roller of big cigars" in the opening line of Wallace Stevens' favorite poem seems to represent an enjoyable luxury for the living, like ice cream, as opposed to the grim presence of death in the next stanza. But Stevens suggests...

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