Notes on Contemporary Literature

Articles from Vol. 39, No. 4, September

Condemning the Neutrals in Oppressively Dull Worlds: Look Back in Anger, a Clockwork Orange, and Equus
Feelings of personal malaise, national diminishment, and general torpor were by no means entirely lifted even when rationing of food and consumer products finally came to a total end in Britain in the early 1950s. Most creative writers, in various...
"Good Country People" Unmasked: Hulga's Journey to Salvation
Mrs. Hopewell and Hulga, the bickering mother and daughter in Flannery O'Connor's "Good Country People," are united by their interest in the legendary category of people for which the story is named. Mrs. Hopewell tells a Bible salesman that "good...
Love on a Three-Day Shoot: Waller's Debt to Hemingway
In the more than fifteen years since it was first published in 1992, Robert James Waller's novella The Bridges of Madison County has been translated into twenty-five languages and has sold over twelve million copies. When it was first published, it...
Shelley and the Waste Land
Shelley's poetry had an intoxicating effect on Eliot during his adolescence and teenage years and profoundly influenced many of his early poems (see Christopher Ricks' extensive notes to Eliot's Inventions of the March Hare: Poems 1909-1917, NY, 1996)....
Woman as Survivor in Oates's Rape: A Love Story
A contemporary Gothic narrative, Joyce Carol Oates's Rape: A Love Story (NY: Carroll & Graf Publishers, 2003) returns to her obsessive concern, namely, the distressing subject of sexual abuse. This paper seeks to show how in embracing a neo-feminist...