UN Chronicle

A news reference publication published by the United Nations. Reports on UN actions and events as it addresses world issues.

Articles from Vol. 43, No. 2, July-August

10 Stories the World Should Hear More About
Concerned that some issues continue not to receive sustained media attention or slip off the radar screen, the United Nations Department of Public Information (DPI) has unveiled a new list of Ten Stories the World Should Hear More About. "The media...
25 Years of AIDS
In June 1981, scientists in the United States reported the first clinical evidence of a disease that would later become known as acquired immunodeficiency syndrome or AIDS. Twenty-five years later, the AIDS epidemic has spread to every corner of the...
AIDS Vaccines: The World's Best Hope to End the AIDS Epidemic
TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AFTER ITS ONSET, AIDS continues to grow and outpace the global response. According to the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) 2006 Report on the global AIDS epidemic, worldwide an estimated 38.6 million people are...
As Long as I Can Remember ... There's Always Been AIDS: In Memory of Lives Lost in 25 Years of AIDS
MY STORY IS ONE AMONG MILLIONS of young people who do not remember a time without a computer, MTV or AIDS. When I was very little, my mother sat me down and told me about a pandemic that would eventually become one of the greatest challenges and threats...
Commission on Sustainable Development: 'We Need a Revolution in Energy Efficiency'
A COMPREHENSIVE AND BROAD-BASED DISCUSSION BY the Commission on Sustainable Development, to review progress in the areas of energy for sustainable development, industrial development, air and atmospheric pollution and climate change, concluded on 12...
Commitments Need to Be Concrete for Second Indigenous Decade
REPRESENTATIVES OF INDIGENOUS PEOPLES, senior United Nations officials and members of nongovernmental organizations gathered at UN Headquarters in New York on 15 May 2006 for the opening ceremony of the fifth session of the United Nations Permanent...
Consensus and Commitment to Save and Sustainably Manage the World's Forests
LONG CONSIDERED A TREMENDOUSLY VALUABLE economic and environmental resource, the world's forests have been shrinking by some 200 square kilometres every day--an area equivalent to the size of Germany every five years. Much of this loss is due to forests...
From the Piazza to the Internet: The Shift from Local Public Space to Global Public Sphere
WHO NEEDS PUBLIC SPACE? Isn't private safer? And is it one space, or many overlapping dimensions, such as the physical three dimensions of urban space: time, the sphere of media and the realm of politics? We may need to look at a more complex and contemporary...
'Fuel for Life': Household Energy and Health
INDOOR AIR POLLUTION FROM COOKING AND HEATING with solid fuels, including wood, dung and coal on open fires or traditional stoves, is responsible for at least 1.5 million deaths every year worldwide. Such pollution causes acute lower respiratory infections...
Global Fund's Grants Show Substantial Impact
WITH NEARLY 400 GRANTS APPROVED, the programmes financed by The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria are proving that treatment and prevention efforts are working where money is invested. The Global Fund works to increase resources to...
HIV/AIDS Response at a Crossroads; the 2006 UN High-Level Meeting: 'Uniting the World against AIDS'
ON THE OCCASION OF THE twenty-fifth anniversary of the first identification of HIV/AIDS cases, the UN General Assembly held a high-level meeting on "Uniting the World against AIDS" and called upon hundreds of participants--from Heads of State or Government...
How to Improve the Lives of 100 Million Slum Dwellers by 2020
PROGRESSIVE THINKING ON SLUMS or informal settlements must engage in two processes that underpin their formation and perpetuation: distorted urban land markets and the way the competition politics of globalization shape local land markets and urban...
Indian Banks Find Interest In: UNEP Solar Loan Approach
IN LESS THAN THREE YEARS, almost 100,000 people in rural areas of southern India obtained clean and reliable electric power because of one main reason: their family could get a loan from a conventional bank that was previously unavailable. More than...
India's Other Virus: Human Trafficking and the Spread of HIV
INDIA'S LOOMING HIV DISASTER terrifies the rest of the world, and its potential to outpace Africa as the world's largest reservoir of the virus has brought out the big money to contain it. World Bank funds are flowing into HIV-prevention programmes....
Indigenous Groups: Make Inroads into the Global Community
INDIGENOUS COMMUNITIES, which make up only 5 per cent of the global population but represent a staggering 15 per cent of the world's poor, are still reeling from the results of centuries of decimation and political brutality: violence, unemployment...
Oil Matters: Economic and Environmental Prospects Hinge on Global Cooperation
FOR DECADES, THE BATTLE LINES OVER OIL, the world markets and the environment have been clearly drawn. But recently there has been an unprecedented shift in the conversation surrounding-energy issues. Scientists and politicians have finally managed...
Public Health Challenges Also Affect Development and Security
WE IN THE UNITED NATIONS FAMILY do know that human health is crucial to our mission for development and security around the world. [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Since your institution was created, life expectancy in this country has literally doubled,...
Singing Their Way out of Poverty: Africa's Urban Youth Find a Voice
SIX YEARS AGO, Joseph Oyoo--popularly known as Gidigidi--was just a young slum dweller with no hope for the future or of ever getting a job. His main worry was where his next meal would come from as his retired father and housewife mother struggled...
The Idea of Global Citizenship: Scholars Debate Notions of Identity and Tolerance at Secretary-General's Lecture
IN THIS RAPIDLY CHANGING WORLD, concepts of human identity can be a seismically divisive force. Across some of the most hostile divides-religious wars, ethnic clashes-those on either sides too often identify themselves exclusively with a particular...
The Rise and Fall of the State Hospital System
PERCHED ATOP A HILL overlooking a small college town in Ohio (United States), Athens State Hospital--now known as The Ridges--has an imposing presence that the banners for the art gallery in the central building do little to diminish. While a fraction...
The State of the World's Cities Report 2006/7: Urban and Slum Trends in the 21st Century
Sometimes it takes just one human being to tip the scales and change the course of history. In 2007, that human being will either move to or be born in a city, and demographers watching urban trends will mark it as the moment when the world entered...
The Strength Of: Rural Women in China; the Role of Women in China in Such Activities as Caring for the Family, Raising Poultry and Livestock, Weaving, Etc., Used to Be Behind the Scenes. Men Tended the Fields, Made Decisions Relating to Daily Life and Rarely Consulted Their Female Partners on Business Matters
In rural communities, land was owned by a few landlords, while villagers lived on very little income, well below the poverty level. However, this began to change in the 1950s with land reform, wherein families were given land to grow crops. Women's...
The World Urban Forum: Ideas on the Future of the World's Cities
THE LIVES OF AT LEAST 100 MILLION slum dwellers will radically improve by 2020 if the promise of Millennium Development Goal (MDG) 7--to ensure environmental sustainability--is kept. The mere thought of it is very encouraging, but the work that remains...
'Trying to Look at Architecture Differently'
DAVID ADJAYE is recognized as one of the leading British architects of his generation. His innovative and engaging designs emphasize the experience of architecture within an urban environment Born in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, to Ghanaian parents, he...
Women and AIDS in South Africa: A Conflicted History Leads to a Dispiriting Present
TEN YEARS AGO, when Prudence Mabele discovered she had HIV, she was told to abandon her studies. She was working towards her degree in analytical chemistry at a time when HIV was neither understood nor tolerated in South Africa. "There were a lot of...
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