University Business

Professional magazine covering the business of higher education.

Articles from Vol. 5, No. 7, September

Art, or Science? Should Higher Ed Fundraising Expenditures Come under New Scrutiny? (Editor's Note)
ONE YEAR AFTER UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY EX-PRESIDENT Charles Wethington lassoed a $265,000/year salary as the school's chief fundraiser, it became apparent that expenses had ratcheted the cost of his fundraising efforts to $400,000 annually. It was...
Charge It: College Student Credit Card Use on the Rise, Says Nellie Mae Study. (Financial Aid Watch)
In its third in a series of credit card usage studies conducted since 1998, Nellie Mae randomly selected data for 600 undergrads, aged 18 to 24, attending four-year public and private institutions. The students had applied for a credit-based loan...
Distance Education Comes Home: No Longer Just for Distance Ed, New Technologies Are Changing the Most Traditional College Campuses. (Technology)
Everything about Hamilton College in Clinton, NY says, "Come live here." This top liberal arts, residential college seems the antithesis of distance education. From its rural hillside campus to the school's description of itself as a "vibrant community"...
Drexel Purchases Wind Power: Demand for Pollution-Free Power Is Growing Nationwide. (Update)
In July, Drexel University (Philadelphia) became the proud owner of a 220-foot-tall wind turbine with the energy output of about 4 million kilowatt hours a year--just about the amount of energy required to power 500 Pennsylvania homes. With nearly...
For-Profits: The Success Continues: Steady Growth for the For-Profit Ed Providers; Apollo Leads Online. (Stats Watch)
With such strong fundamentals in a dismal economic environment, for-profit postsecondary education (composed of for-profit postsecondary educational institutions, the majority of which are degree-granting) once again illustrated why it is one of...
Hurry Up and Graduate. (Controversy)
COLLEGE TOWNS ARE MECCAS. And that is bothering officials at the University of Georgia, in Athens. Concerned that a sluggish graduation rate has exacerbated congestion on its 605-acre campus, they have taken action to discourage dawdlers. In...
Making the Marriage Last: Don't Let Your Top Administrators Fall from Grace; Have a Solid Game Plan for Their Successful Retention. (People & Politics)
A new president, academic officer, or other administrator arrives on campus with credentials that, on paper, seem closely aligned with the criteria established by the search committee. The candidate receives a comprehensive campus tour and meets...
More on Alcohol Abuse. (Letters)
Just got my copy of University Business and I am ecstatic rereading your Editor's Note, "On the Alcohol Abuse Crisis" [July/August 2002]. I wish I had written the piece. WILLIAM SALAZAR, Research Associate, IRAPP Morehead State University, Morehead,...
No Competition: It Looks like the Value of a Bachelor's Degree Will Continue to Rise. but What If It Doesn't? (Viewpoint)
Sometimes a school's most troublesome competitor is not another school, but no school at all. That's a lesson I learned a few years back teaching in a graduate journalism program. Certainly other schools wanted to recruit some of the same students...
No Troubled President Here. (Letters)
We were shocked to see our president included in your cover story "The Troubled Presidency" in the July/August issue of University Business. Since when does making tough, but necessary decisions automatically label an executive as "troubled"? A...
Princeton Behind Online Espionage? Covert Admissions Activity Hits the Ivy League. (in the News)
It might look as if Shirley Tilghman, president of Princeton University, is letting her admissions staff off easy for hacking into Yale's Web site. Tilghman is reassigning Stephen LeMenager, the director of Admissions at Princeton (and a Princeton...
Putting the `Community' Back in Community Colleges: Community Colleges in Distressed Rural America Are Mobilizing Local Leaders and Supporting Business Development-Revitalizing Region and College. (Community Partnering)
Since Hocking College opened in 1968, it has been known in its community of rural Nelsonville, OH, as "the little college that could." Nelsonville--identified not long ago by the Appalachian Regional Commission as severely depressed due to high...
Recruiting the E-Generation: Smart Admissions Administrators Are Now Using the Web to Increase Yield. (Online)
According to the Pew Internet & American Life Project 2000 (www.pewinternet.org/reports), nearly three-quarters of young Americans between the ages of 12 and 17 go online regularly, and about half of all American high school students go online...
Sense and Sensibility: U of Hawaii President Evan Dobelle Says He Sees No Difference in Non-Profit and For-Profit Negotiation. It's All about Common Sense, Receptivity, and Something Higher Ed Is Not Particularly Good At: Speed. (Negotiation)(Cover Story)
When Evan Dobelle replaced Kenneth Mortimer as University of Hawaii president in early July 2001, he arrived on the heels of a 13-day strike by Hawaiian public school educators and university professors. The higher ed share of that action was set...
Teaching the Teacher: Distance Ed Instructors Aren't Born, They're Made. Then They're Quality Controlled. Is This Any Way to Run a University? (Training/Online Education)
Mark Zupan, Dean of the Eller College of Business and Public Administration at the University of Arizona, is facing a bit of a quandary. The school's Department of Management Information Systems (MIS) ranked fourth in the country in U.S. News &...
There's Power in Honor: Honors Programs and Colleges Are Proliferating for Good Reason: They're Benefiting Students and IHE. (Marketing)
Currently, there are 3,600 colleges and universities in the United States. At last count, approximately 1,400 of them have honors programs and colleges. This finding brings to light three factors that may surprise you: First, many of the colleges...
Too Late for Early: The "Early Something" Admission Process Is Crumbling, and Rolling Is the Way to Go. (the Admissions Angle)
As with most aspects of college admission, if you get tired of--or even just get used to--the ways things are, you need only wait a few years and they will change. So it's no surprise that changes are afoot again in college admission plans, which...
To Spend, or Not to Spend: ... That Is the Question. (on the Money)
Times are tough; we need the money. Times ore tough; we better not spend it. This pretty much sums up the discussion going on across campuses today. After the second straight fiscal year of endowments losing money on average, the tension between...
We Have Seen the Enemy ...; One Year after 9/11, College and Universities Are Using the Impetus to Jump-Start Disaster Response Plans for `More Likely' Scenarios. (Security)
In the days and weeks following the September 11 attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, there was no shortage of terrorist attack warnings, bomb threats, anthrax scares, suspected air and water contamination, and cyberattacks. Colleges...