Brookings Review

Quarterly magazine focuses on economic, political and foreign policy issues.

Articles from Vol. 18, No. 4, Fall

China
Searching for a Post--Cold War Formula Of all the bilateral relationships the United States will negotiate in the coming decade, the most critical--and complex--is that with the People's Republic of China. While 1999 marked a new low for U.S.-China...
Doing It Right
The Future of Humanitarian Intervention Using military force to save lives is difficult, dangerous, rarely politically rewarding--and yet somehow here to stay. American presidents, UN Security Councils, and western publics will almost always want...
Europe
Rebalancing the U.S.-European Relationship Though it may not seem obvious from a quick scan of world press headlines, relations between the United States and Europe are as healthy as they have ever been. The main disputes mostly concern trade--and...
Foreign Policy IN THE AGE OF PRIMACY
Historians and theologians continue to debate the precise start of the new millennium, but by January 2001 the world will have marked another global milestone. When the new U.S. administration and the new Congress take office, the second decade of...
India
Old Issues and New Opportunities After a decade of drift and uncertainty, India is undergoing rapid and generally positive change and is taking its expected place as one of the three major states of Asia. Its economy is less advanced than that of...
Japan
Nudging an Underachiever into a Greater Global Role What a difference a decade makes. In the late 1980s, Japan was highly visible in Washington--its strong economic performance the object of either admiration or unease--and seemed on the verge of...
No Way Out
The Essential U.S. Role in the Middle East In a paradox befitting one of the world's most complex regions, the Middle East entered the new millennium closer to peace--but also closer to possible conflict--than it has been for some time. Seven years...
Promoting Democracy AND Human Rights
Lessons of the 1990s Since 1975 the number of nations under some form of democratic government has quadrupled. Today more than 2.3 billion people, 39 percent of the world's population, are living in countries rated "Free" by Freedom House, which...
REPLACING THE ROGUE Rhetoric
A New Label Opens the Way to a Better Policy Last June the Clinton administration formally retired the label "rogue states," which it had long used to describe Cuba, Iran, Iraq, Libya, and North Korea, and replaced it with the more innocuous "states...
Russia
The U.S. Response to Changing Policy Imperatives The 1990s were a disappointing decade for Russia, marked by severe economic decline and two devastating wars in Chechnya. Internationally, with the collapse of the USSR, Russia lost much of its stature...
The Nuclear Agenda
Arms Control and Missile Defense Are Back in the News The nuclear debate is back. After fading from the public eye in the 1990s, arms control and missile defense are once again at the forefront of the American national security agenda. Not surprisingly,...
Trade Policy What Next?
The anti-globalization forces of Seattle who swept through Washington, D.C., last May may have caused only minor disruptions of the spring meetings of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank, but they provided an apt symbol for the directionless...