Brookings Review

Quarterly magazine focuses on economic, political and foreign policy issues.

Articles from Vol. 21, No. 3, Summer

Arab Public Opinion on the United States and Iraq: Postwar Prospects for Changing Prewar Views
A survey that I conducted in six Arab countries in late February and early March found an unprecedented tide of public opinion running against the United States as American troops massed outside Iraq. Only 4 percent of respondents in Saudi Arabia,...
Can We Trust the Polls? It All Depends
Can we trust the polls? Under the best of circumstances, the answer is "Not necessarily without a fair amount of detailed information about how they were conducted." This general note of caution applies at any time to any poll consumer. But today,...
From Hootie to Harry (and Louise). Pooling and Interest Groups
Hootie Johnson probably wouldn't kick a ball out of the rough or mark down a par after making a bogey. As the chairman of Augusta National Golf Club, home of the Masters, Johnson knows that, above all, golf is a of integrity. So it is astonishing that...
Informed Public Opinion about Foreign Policy: The Uses of Deliberative Polling
Only one-sixth of the respondents to a January 12, 2003, poll for the Knight-Ridder newspapers knew that none of the September 11 terrorist hijackers was an Iraqi citizen. One-third said they did not know whether the hijackers were Iraqis, and almost...
Is "Popular Rule" Possible? Polls, Political Psychology, and Democracy
The celebrated political philosopher H. L. Mencken once characterized democracy as "the theory that the common people know what they want, and deserve to get it good and hard." Democratic theorists have mostly focused on the latter issue, without taking...
Polls or Pols? the Real Driving Force Behind Presidential Nominations
Since the publication in 1971 of David Broder's influential book The Party's Over, pundits and scholars have written of the decline of political parties. Although observers now recognize a party "revival" of sorts in Congress, within the electorate,...
Pooling & Public Opinion: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly. (Cover Story)
If you took a public opinion poll about polls, odds are that a majority would offer some rather unfavorable views of pollsters and the uses to which their work is put. Many potential respondents might simply slam down their telephones. Yet if you asked...
Postindustrial Hopes Deferred: Why the Democratic Majority Is Still Likely to Emerge
Early during the summer of 2002, as the economy slowed and the winds of scandal swept through Washington and Wall Street, it looked as if the Democrats might win big in November, despite the post-September 11 boost in the GOP's fortunes. But the two-month-long...
Rally 'Round the Flag: Opinion in the United States before and after the Iraq War
The Iraq War validated a basic rule of American politics: the American public closes ranks in times of national crisis. In the prolonged march to war, the public was divided and ambivalent about the wisdom of invading Iraq rather than relying on continued...
Tax Uncertainty: A Divided America's Unformed View of the Federal Tax System
With tax cuts as the centerpiece of the Bush administration's domestic policy agenda, the president himself hit the road this spring to try to gin up public support. But as Congress and the White House carried the issue deep into the arcana of hundreds...
The Continued GOP Majority? Prospects Look Good for Republicans in '04
Last year, John Judis and Ruy Teixeira released their new book, The Emerging Democratic Majority, which argues that demographic changes over the past decade are moving the Democrats to majority status--and destining Republicans to suffer in elections....
Vox Populi: Public Opinion and the Democratic Dilemma
Now at the feast the governor was accustomed to release for the crowd any one prisoner whom they wanted.... The governor again said to them, "Which of the two do you want me to release for you?" And they said, "Barabbas." Pilate said to them, "Then...
Words vs. Deeds: President George W. Bush and Polling
President George W. Bush pledged repeatedly throughout his presidential campaign that his administration would have no use for polls and focus groups: "I really don't care what polls and focus groups say. What I care about is doing what I think is...