Brookings Review

Quarterly magazine focuses on economic, political and foreign policy issues.

Articles from Vol. 21, No. 1, Winter

Can the Government Be Serious? September 11 Challenges Washington to Return to Its Core Responsibilities
What had Washington been like in the years immediately preceding September 11? As even an amnesiac will surely recall, the American capital at the end of the second millennium, like Rome at the start of the first, was consumed with palace intrigue,...
Medical Innovation: Promise & Pitfalls
Medical innovation holds the promise of dramatically improving health and extending lives. It also threatens crushing increases in medical costs and, because of rising costs, sharply increased inequality of access to medical care. The challenge of...
No Stepping Back: America's International Economic Agenda for 2003-05
September 11 was a defining event for America's international economic posture. International engagement, we now know, is not a matter up for debate but a fact of our times. Securing the U.S. homeland will require extensive cooperation from nations...
Regenerative Medicine: A Future Healing Art
The era of regenerative medicine is upon us. Rapidly advancing medical knowledge is leading to the development of powerful new gene-based therapies that will transform medical practice, allowing most people to live much longer and healthier lives....
Rights, Liberties, and Security: Recalibrating the Balance after September 11
When dangers increase, liberties shrink. That has been our history, especially in wartime. And today we face dangers without precedent: a mass movement of militant Islamic terrorists who crave martyrdom, hide in shadows, are fanatically bent on slaughtering...
The Globalization of Politics: American Foreign Policy for a New Century
September 11 signaled the end of the age of geopolitics and the advent of a new age--the era of global politics. The challenge U.S. policymakers face today is to recognize that fundamental change in world politics and to use America's unrivaled military,...
The New Terrorism: Securing the Nation against a Messianic Foe
In the minds of the men who carried them out, the attacks of September 11 were acts of religious devotion--a form of worship, conducted in God's name and in accordance with his wishes. The enemy was the infidel; the opposing ideology, "Western culture."...
Toward an Agenda
The reality shock of September 11, 2001, reminded Americans that the federal government's first order of business is to protect the nation from its enemies. Keeping a steady focus on that primary obligation had often proved difficult in recent years,...