Brookings Review

Quarterly magazine focuses on economic, political and foreign policy issues.

Articles from Vol. 13, No. 1, Winter

After the Electoral Earthquake
The political shock waves from the 1994 midterm election continue to reverberate in Washington. For once, the orgy of punditry seems commensurate with the event. The extraordinary dimensions of the Republican party sweep are by now familiar. The GOP...
A GI Bill for Kids
Everyone whose knees jerk at the mention of school choice (which means almost everyone) should pause to consider Diane Ravitch's argument ("Somebody's Children," fall issue): "Nobody's children should be compelled to attend a bad public school." I graduated...
A New Mexico? toward a U.S.-Mexican Partnership
Mexico has been much in the news this past year. On January 1 the long- and rancorously debated North American Free Trade Agreement finally went into effect. In April Mexico was invited to join the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development,...
Bosnia's Muslims? A Fundamentalist Threat?
Serb nationalists are convinced that the Muslims of Bosnia are fundamentalists intent on establishing a radical, Iranian-style Islamic republic--one in which all women would be veiled and all Christians oppressed. Since 1992, say the Serbs, Muslims have...
Corporate "Ownership."
The most misleading word in the ongoing debate about the governance and control of large, publicly traded corporations is "owner." In much of the media coverage about takeovers and boardroom shakeups, as well as in the vast academic and policy literature...
Democracy and Economic Reform: Can They Co-Exit in Peru?
Few countries in the world have made turnarounds as dramatic as Peru's. When President Alberto Fujimori was inaugurated in July of 1990, Peru was in the midst of one of the longest-running hyperinflations in history. Annual inflation was more than 8,000...
"Does Prison Pay?" Revisited
Returning to the Crime Scene Several years ago, in these pages, we tried to referee an acrimonious debate between criminologists who insisted that prisons "cost too much" and those who responded that they "protect too little." Our contention was that...
It's Time to Review U.S. Cuba Policy
During the past year U.S. policy toward Cuba has come under unusually intensive and broad-based criticism. The lineup of those who have publicly opposed the policy--and called for the United States to ease sanctions and engage the Cuban regime--cuts...
Mafiosi and Matrioshki; Organized Crime and Russian Reform
By nearly all accounts, Russia is in the midst of a crime explosion. According to official statistics, the number of reported crimes has doubled since 1985. Organized criminal activity appears to be growing even more quickly. The number of organized...
Reinventing Capitol Hill?
THE NPR MEETS CONGRESS To hear the Clinton administration tell it, Congress should be scrambling to help the National Performance Review's administrative revolution succeed. Reinvented federal agencies would unshackle their employees to be more creative,...
Reluctant Strategic Realignment; the Need for a New View of National Security
The United States is having difficulty emerging from the conceptual and institutional grip of the Cold War. Though we have declared the ideological confrontation ended and have tempered our political rhetoric-accordingly, we have not fundamentally altered...
The Extra Mile; Rethinking Energy Policy for Automotive Transportation
This witticism, directed at the United States by a former foreign minister of France, can't be shrugged off. Obviously, stiffer taxation of gasoline cannot "fix" a deteriorating system of education, the cost of health care, or crime rates. Americans,...
What Killed Health Care Reform?
In January 1993, enactment of comprehensive health care reform was widely believed to be inevitable. By September 1994, not even incremental change could be enacted. In the recent election, health care was barely an issue. How did health reform go from...