Brookings Review

Quarterly magazine focuses on economic, political and foreign policy issues.

Articles from Vol. 14, No. 1, Winter

Can Bosnia Be Reunified? Facing Military Reality in the Former Yugoslavia
FACING MILITARY REALITY IN THE FORMER YUGOSLAVIA Although ambiguity may be the ally of the diplomat, it is a dangerous companion for the military planner. If Bosnian peace negotiations succeed as hoped, NATO and any other participants must design an...
Controlling the Uncontrollable
REFORMING U.S. EXPORT CONTROLS ON COMPUTERS Last October the Clinton administration unveiled its second major reform of U.S. export control policies for powerful computers. The 1995 reforms, coming only two years on the heels of an earlier loosening...
Economic Engine? Foreign Trade and Investment in China
Since the late 1970s, when economic reform began in China, the role of the foreign sector has burgeoned in ways that no one anticipated. Today China is one of the world's largest trading nations and a major participant in international financial markets....
End of an Era: The New Debate over Health Care Financing
The collapse of the Clinton health care reform plan and the Republican electoral victory in November 1994 put an end to the health care financing debate as we have known it for 50 years. President Clinton's proposal to provide all Americans with health...
Growing Pains: Trade Frictions Corrode the U.S.-Asian Relationship
Economic relations between the United States and Asia are coming under increasing strain. Trade tensions once confined to the United States and Japan are extending to the rest of Asia, particularly the fast-growing economies of East Asia and China. Many...
Having It All? Domestic Regulations and the Global Economy
Each year the U.S. government publishes a revealing report about the rest of the world's policies, practices, and "acts" that are said to impair American commerce and prosperity. No less interesting would be to list the numerous U.S. rules and acts that...
Insurance or Gambling? Derivatives Trading in a World of Risk and Uncertainty
The appearance of the multi-trillion-dollar market for financial derivatives was hailed, not so long ago, as triumphant evidence of U.S. capital markets' capacity to evolve to meet investors' needs. Academics and policymakers alike described derivatives...
Rabin's Legacy: New Coalitions for Peace
In death, Yitzhak Rabin could have an even more profound impact on Arab-Israeli peace than he had in life. Although the Jewish extremist who murdered Israel's prime minister in Tel Aviv on November 4 was convinced that Rabin's death would derail Middle...
The Daiwa Affair
Last June 27, addressing the 49th annual convention of the Federation of Bankers Associations of Japan, its chairman Toru Hashimoto told his listeners - including Japan's prime minister, the finance minister, the minister of state for economic planning,...
The Majority Rules: Don't Look Now, but the Congressional Budget Process Is Working
(DON'T LOOK NOW, BUT THE CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET PROCESS IS WORKING) In 1995 almost all legislative roads led to the congressional budget process. Efforts to balance the budget, cut federal taxes, terminate or curtail hundreds of programs and agencies,...
U.S. Policy towards Cuba
Short of a military invasion or assassination - both currently inconceivable - the United States can do nothing either to depose Fidel Castro or to force him to make Cuban politics more humane or democratic. While continuing to oppose his regime, U.S....
Waves of the Future: Are We Ready to Deregulate Telecommunications?
ARE WE READY TO DEREGULATE TELECOMMUNICATIONS? The shift in the political control of Congress following the 1994 elections has spawned a new effort to revise the 1934 Communications Act to "reform" regulation in the telecommunications market and increase...