Brookings Review

Quarterly magazine focuses on economic, political and foreign policy issues.

Articles from Vol. 10, No. 2, Spring

A Race for Secretary of State
Since 1955 a nonpartisan organization in New York called Freedom House has issued an annual year-end survey of the state of freedom in the world. This January their report shows free societies continuing to rise to an all-time high: 89 democracies...
Dismantling the Arsenals: Arms Control and the New World Agenda
The collapse of communism and the promise of a more cooperative East-West relationship have transformed the world of arms control. Goals that were once unthinkable--making enormous cuts in strategic forces or actually destroying nuclear warheads--are...
Down in the Dumps: Administering America's "Unfair" Trade Laws
Unfair trade. The term itself invites condemnation. Certainly many nations think so. The more than 90 signatories to the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade allow member countries to impose import duties to counter unfair pricing ("dumping") by...
FSX and the New World Order
In 1989 a U.S. agreement to collaborate with Japan in developing the FSX, a new tactical aircraft, became a lightning rod for the economic tensions that now plague U.S.-Japanese relations. Seeing Japan less as an ally than as an economic adversary,...
Global Warming Negotiations: Does Fairness Matter?
This June the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development will meet in Rio de Janeiro. High on its agenda will be global warming, an issue almost unique in its combination of portent and uncertainty. By and large, most scientists are convinced...
Japan in the 1990s: A New Kind of World Power
When President Bush traveled to Tokyo at the end of his Asia trip last January, he cast himself as a saleman for American products, calling for jobs, jobs, jobs." Continuing the effort to make Japan a more open market for foreign products is a laudable...
Neither Friend nor Foe: A China Policy for the Nineties
At the end of February China and the United States passed a major milestone: the 20th anniversary of Richard Nixon's visit to China and the signing of the Shanghai Communique in 1972. Neither country, however, is in the mood to celebrate. Americans...
Term Limits and the Immortal Congress
The idea of limiting the number of terms a member of Congress may serve has been rattling around since the Constitution was a gleam in the eye of the framers. But until 1990 it was just another idea whose time had not come. In 1990 California, Colorado,...
The Economy: Three Problems, Not One
The stalled economic recovery that is grabbing all the headlines these days is a serious setback, but it is actually less serious that two other longer-term problems from which our economy suffers. The first problem, sluggish growth in national productivity,...
The Return to History: The Breakup of the Soviet Union
SINCE 1989 events in Central and Eastern Europe have given rise to a number of questions--and false hopes--about the alternatives to communism in countries that have been ruled by Marxist-Leninist governments for many decades. The dissolution of communist...
The Wrong Medicine: Term Limits Won't Cure What Ails Congressional Elections
Bill Frenzel's case for congressional term limits is disarmingly attractive. No fire and brimstone about the corruption of Congress. No grandiose claim that limits will produce higher quality members or more effective national policymaking. No expedient...
Toward U.S.-Japanese Cooperation
When President Bush made his trip to Japan last January, he brought political troubles on himself, but, more important, he let slip an opportunity for Japan and the United States to work toward genuine cooperation in the area of trade. And Japan's...
When Work Doesn't Work: Employment Programs for Welfare Recipients
The nation's welfare rolls are soaring. After growing slowly for most of the past two decades, the number of families collecting Aid to Families with Dependent Children shot up 870,000--or nearly one quarter-- between July 1989 and October 1991. The...
Zambia's Democratic Transition: The Beginning of the End of the One-Party State in Africa?
Last fall, Zambia, a small, landlocked Southern African nation, one of the world's poorest countries, made a dramatic and surprisingly peaceful transition from one-party rule to democracy. On October 31, in the first free and competitive elections...