Brookings Review

Quarterly magazine focuses on economic, political and foreign policy issues.

Articles from Vol. 11, No. 2, Spring

Africa and the New World Dis-Order: Rethinking Colonial Borders
As the drama of the fall of the Berlin Wall and the breakup of the Soviet Union begins to recede into memory, overtaken by the Persian Gulf War, the wars in Yugoslavia, and the landing of U.S. troops in Somalia, the notion of sovereignty within national...
An End to the War on Waste
The Cold War was not the only war put behind us during the Bush years. So, too, apparently, was the war on waste. We haven't had a big procurement scandal for five years now, and Ronald Reagan's estimate of $100 billion lost each year is long forgotten....
Avoiding the Next Guaranteed Bailout: Reforms for the Pension Insurance Program
During the second presidential debate last fall, Bill Clinton responded to a question about the projected bankruptcy of the federal pension guarantee fund by expressing a determination to change the system. "It's not enough just to have a guarantee,"...
Clinton's Realistic Economic Vision
Finally the American people are being treated as intelligent citizens by their president. In his February 17 economic message to Congress, President Clinton laid out forthrightly what we must do to restore self-respect at home and our claim to leadership...
Drexel: Some Lessons for the Future
In a brief five-year period Drexel Burnham Lambert rose from relative obscurity to become one of the most profitable and powerful investment banks on Wall Street. After pleading guilty to six felony counts in January 1989, the firm's business spiraled...
Health Care Reform: Six Questions for President Clinton
Health care reform was high on Bill Clinton's agenda during the presidential campaign and is even higher now that he occupies the Oval Office, as evidenced by his quick appointment of a task force headed by Hillary Rodham Clinton, his most trusted adviser....
Israel and the End of the Cold War: The Shadow Has Faded
The end of the Cold War and the breakup of the Soviet Union have profoundly affected the Middle East. On the strategic level, the deglobalization of the Arab-Israeli conflict--brought about by the loss of the radical Arab side's Soviet patron--made the...
Next Steps in Somalia
The first phase of the international intervention in Somalia that began on December 9 is nearing a close. Recent clashes and violent demonstrations may delay the departure of the remaining U.S. forces deployed in Operation Restore Hope. The United States,...
Stopping the Buck Here: The Case for Campaign Spending Limits
Everybody--the public, members of Congress, campaign contributors, and, as always, Common Cause--seems to be dissatisfied with the way congressional campaigns are financed. The call for change is loud and steady. Campaign finance reform is such a prominent...
Turnout in the 1992 Election
Voter turnout rose smartly in the 1992 presidential election, from about 50 percent of the voting-age population in 1988 to about 55 percent. The increase was the first substantial one since 1960 (the only other increase since 1960 was a slight half...
Urban Traffic Congestion: A New Approach to the Gordian Knot
As traffic policy in the United States has lurched from the contentious highway building of the 1960s to the ineffectual travel-demand management of more recent years, congestion in the nation's cities has worsened steadily. In his recent book, Stuck...
Worldwide Drug Scourge: The Response
This article is the second of a two-part series examining the global drug challenge in the post-Cold War era. The 1992 presidential campaign came and went with hardly a word about one of the most vexing policy challenges of our time: what to do about...