Brookings Review

Quarterly magazine focuses on economic, political and foreign policy issues.

Articles from Vol. 17, No. 1, Winter

Citizens to the Rescue
Surely 1998 will not go down in the annals of American history as a year ennobling for the president, productive for the Congress, or triumphant for the press. To the extent that the health of our democracy depends on the good judgement, restraint,...
Defense and Foreign Policy
The Budget Cuts Are Going Too Far U.S. spending on foreign policy has declined about far enough. Additional cuts still planned under the 1997 balanced budget agreement would go too far. Fortunately, those cuts are likely to be rethought in light...
Federal Crime Policy Time for a Moratorium
BEFORE THE LATE 1960s, crime was rarely on the federal government's agenda--for at least three reasons. First, most legal experts and judges thought that the national government had no constitutional role in crime control. Second, the public at large...
Getting Realistic about Russia
No Time for Illusions The collapse last August of Russian financial markets and the dismissal of the Kiriyenko government is seen in Russia as the end of an era. Radical market reform is over. In its place is emerging a new "Moscow consensus." Now,...
Growing American Inequality
Sources and Remedies Over the past two decades the United States has experienced a startling increase in inequality. The incomes of poor Americans shrank and those of the middle class stagnated while the incomes of the richest families continued...
Setting National Priorities
The New Environment THE ENVIRONMENT in which the debate over national priorities takes place has changed markedly over the past decade. The Cold War has ended, fortunately with a whimper not a bang, allowing the United States to scale back its military...
Should We Retire Social Security?
Grading the Reform Plans Most Americans understand that Social Security faces a long-term imbalance between the cost of benefits promised under current law and the program's projected income. They realize that the looming deficits arise from the...
Student Performance
For more than 30 years, the primary goal of U.S. federal education policy has been to ensure equality of educational opportunity. The creation of programs like Title I, Head Start, and bilingual education in the 1960s and special education for handicapped...
The Politics of Automobility
FEWER TRIPS OR BETTER CARS? THE AUTOMOBILE is the solution to most Americans' transportation needs. But its very success has generated serious problems--most notably, congestion, pollution, and energy inefficiency--that need to be addressed by public...
Trade Policy at a Cross Roads
AN APPROACH FOR 1999--AND BEYOND For U.S. Trade Policy, the past quarter-century is not without irony. Its first 20 years were replete with economic troubles, real and perceived: "oil shocks" and double-digit inflation in the 1970s; the "twin deficits"...
Why Are Taxes So Complicated? and What Can We Do about It?
The time, money, and aggravation that tens of millions of Americans expend to understand and comply with the income tax is, it turns out, nothing new. In his 1776 The Wealth of Nations, Adam Smith noted that "subjecting the people to the frequent visits...