Brookings Review

Quarterly magazine focuses on economic, political and foreign policy issues.

Articles from Vol. 16, No. 4, Fall

Conflict or Consensus? Forty Years of Minnesota Metropolitan Politics
Skeptics tell me that regional equity reform will never hap pen in America's metropolitan regions because the suburbs are now in charge of American politics. It may be true that the suburbs are in charge of American politics. But the politics of metropolitan...
Equal Opportunity? Title IX and Intercollegiate Sports
The subtext of Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 as it applies to intercollegiate sports could easily be "Bear Bryant in the age of postmodernism." Bear Bryant, the legendary coach of the powerful University of Alabama football teams of...
Fat City: Understanding American Urban Form from a Transatlantic Perspective
Urban settlements grow in three directions: up into high-rise buildings, in by crowding, or out into the suburbs. Although cities everywhere have developed in each of these ways at various times, nowhere in Europe has the outward dispersal of people...
How America's Cities Are Growing: The Big Picture
Suburban sprawl has been the dominant form of metropolitan-area growth in the United States for the past 50 years. This article analyzes the nature of such sprawl, why it occurs in U.S. metropolitan areas, the problems it causes or aggravates, and some...
Metropolitan Areas: Regional Difference
The new argument in the urban research Literature of the 1990s is that the economic health of cities and suburbs is closely Linked, with the prosperity of suburban communities, in particular, depending on that of the central city. Suburbs that ignore...
Prove It: The Costs and Benefits of Sprawl
Cities have been generating suburbs for as long as records have existed. Most of the world's large cities are growing outward now, and very Likely the pace will accelerate in the new age of information networking. Unpopular as the word is in some quarters,...
Race Space; What Really Drives Metropolitan Growth
I recently met with a high-ranking administrator in a large, predominantly African-American city to discuss the problems that cities like his face, from failing school systems, depopulation, and business and job loss to the suburbs, to a housing crisis...
Stock Flow: Making Better Use of Metropolitan Resources
One of the most striking features of politics and management in cities around the world is the belief that "the next new project" will solve the most pressing problems of the day. The political compulsion to cut red ribbons, coupled with the professional...
The Exploding Metropolis; Why Growth Management Makes Sense
America is more than ever a Land of metropolitan regions. Today those regions are home to five-sixths of our population and economic activity. But accompanying the explosive growth of U.S. metropolitan regions in the second half of the 20th century,...
The Intromissibility of a Paretian Athletic Director
The intercollegiate teams of a college comprise about 500 players. Most other students who enjoy participating in athletics gain satisfaction through intramural and recreational programs. Varsities have recently provoked something of a commotion....
The Market and Metropolitanism
Most contributors to this Review symposium have identified the key role of public policies in shaping our metropolitan areas. Certainly, public policies enacted immediately after World War II, which provided government-backed mortgage insurance for...
The Metropolitan Challenge
When I think of metropolitanism, I am reminded of something National Geographic magazine wrote about New Jersey. "Once isolated villages have expanded so rapidly that outsiders cannot tell where one ends and the other begins." That sentence was written...
The View from Capitol Hill
In the past five years, increased attention to the rote government policies play in such problems as urban sprawl and central-city deterioration has motivated academics, advocates, administrators, and even, occasionally, federal legislators to focus...
The View from the Metropolis
Metropolitan regions Like greater Chicago cover hundreds of square miles, contain scores of independent jurisdictions, and house an enormously varied population. Yet they are bound, as Anthony Downs shows, by an intricate web of interdependencies. Although...