Journal of Private Enterprise

Articles from Vol. 18, No. 2, Spring

A Review Activity for Economics
Much of the recent focus of the economic education literature concerns the instructional methods used in college courses. Becker and Watts (1996) described the primary teaching tools employed by economists as "chalk and talk." In their survey of college...
Contracts without Government*
From time immemorial men have pondered the question of anarchy. While it seems as though government has simply "always been there," it clearly has not. Social interaction both logically and temporally precedes government. Men must have interacted for...
Economics: Writing to Learn and Learning to Write
For four years we have paired one section of an introductory economics class with two sections of a required freshman writing course. We believe our successful experience will be useful to other faculty members who may wish to try this or a similar interdisciplinary...
Getting Students to Think outside the Box
Benjamin Bloom's taxonomy identifies six different levels of student learning (Bloom, 1956). A course employing his concepts develops a lesson plan whereby students are moved from lower order learning objectives (knowledge, comprehension, application)...
Jonathan Gullible: Battling State Ogres with 1000 Blows of Satire
According to The Economist magazine, there is a crisis in the economics profession. Wrote the editors:"Why has economics not done better? Economists tend to blame others for being too lazy or too stupid to understand their textbooks. There is doubtless...
The Mystery of Capital and Economic Calculation: How De Soto's Insights Illuminate the Austrian Case for Private Property
In the Socialist Calculation Debate, Mises and Hayek argue that in the absence of private ownership of the means of production, economic calculation is impossible.1 In its simple form, the MisesHayek contention is an either-or proposition: either we...
Trust in Government as a Constitutional Consequence*
Trust in government has fallen to levels that disturb many of those who concern themselves with public opinion and its impact on the political process. For example, Joseph Nye (1997: 4), Dean of Harvard's Kennedy School of Government, worries that "if...
Virtue or Vice? A Pedagogical History of the Self-Interest Hypothesis
It is not from the benevolence of the butcher, the brewer, or the baker, that we expect our dinner, but from regard to their own interests. We address ourselves, not to their humanity but to their self-love, and never talk of our own necessities but...