Family Relations

Family Relations is a journal for family practitioners and academics on relationships across the life cycle with implications for intervention, education and public policy. It is published five times a year by the National Council on Family Relations. Editorial headquarters are in Blacksburg, Va. It has been in publication since 1951. Subjects covered include sociology, marriage and family.

Articles from Vol. 56, No. 2, April

Ambiguous Loss after Lesbian Couples with Children Break Up: A Case for Same-Gender Divorce*
Abstract:The theory of ambiguous loss is applied to structural ambiguity and personal transcendence in the parent-child relationship following a same-gender relational ending. Working recursively through the six guidelines of ambiguous loss (finding...
Ambiguous Loss in Families of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders*
Abstract:Learning that a child has a lifelong developmental disorder is stressful and challenging to any family, yet it is clear that some families adapt and adjust more readily than others. In this article, it is proposed that a diagnosis of an autism...
Ambiguous Loss Theory: Challenges for Scholars and Practitioners
IntroductionOn the occasion of my retirement from the University of Minnesota, a symposium was held to encourage the continuation of research about ambiguous loss and boundary ambiguity. This special issue continues that goal. The papers herein illustrate...
An Exploration of Aspects of Boundary Ambiguity among Young, Unmarried Fathers during the Prenatal Period
Abstract:This research represents an exploration of patterns of boundary ambiguity among poor, young, unmarried men and their reproductive partners. Interviews were conducted with men and their partners during the third trimester of pregnancy. Interviews...
Another Kind of Ambiguous Loss: Seventh-Day Adventist Women in Mixed-Orientation Marriages
Abstract:Narratives of five Seventh-day Adventist heterosexual women whose mixed-orientation marriages ended were analyzed through the lens of ambiguous loss. Thematic coding identified a wave-like process of changing emotional foci that emerged from...
Boundary Ambiguity in Parents with Chronically Ill Children: Integrating Theory and Research
Abstract:This article integrates theory and research related to boundary ambiguity in parents of children with a chronic health condition. We propose that boundary ambiguity is a risk factor for psychological distress in these parents. Clinical applications...
Dimensions of Ambiguous Loss in Couples Coping with Mild Cognitive Impairment*
Abstract:We applied the theory of ambiguous loss to couples with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), an age-related decline in memory and other cognitive processes assumed not to interfere with daily activities or the maintenance of personal relationships....
Family Boundary Ambiguity: A 30-Year Review of Theory, Research, and Measurement
Abstract:Since its introduction 30 years ago, family boundary ambiguity (BA) has been a widely used construct in family stress research and clinical intervention. In this article, we present a comprehensive and interdisciplinary review of published research...
Parental Deployment and Youth in Military Families: Exploring Uncertainty and Ambiguous Loss*
Abstract:Parental deployment has substantial effects on the family system, among them ambiguity and uncertainty. Youth in military families are especially affected by parental deployment because their coping repertoire is only just developing; the requirements...
The Ambiguities of Out-of-Home Care: Children with Severe or Profound Disabilities*
Abstract:Ambiguous loss and boundary ambiguity experienced by families during the process of placing their child in out-of-home care was described by parents in 20 families raising a child with severe or profound developmental disabilities. In retrospective...
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