Political Research Quarterly

Articles from Vol. 57, No. 1, March

Acclimation and Attitudes: "Newcomer" Justices and Precedent Conformance on the Supreme Court
Do newly appointed justices experience acclimation effects upon their ascent to the Supreme Court? We contend that acclimation is a process, as justices' conformation to the doctrine of stare decisis is partly a function of tenure length. We find that...
A Neopluralist Perspective on Research on Organized Interests
We modestly challenge Baumgartner and Leech's (1998) very pessimistic assessment of the state of interest group research by arguing that there has been a rich collaboration of theory and data during the 1990s, which at least points toward a new and more...
A Preference for Deference? the Supreme Court and Judicial Review
The power of the Supreme Court to declare laws unconstitutional remains as troubling today as when first introduced in Marbury v. Madison. While the normative arguments will perhaps always remain unsettled, the empirical question of when and how often...
Disentangling Diffusion: The Effects of Social Learning and Economic Competition on State Policy Innovation and Expansion
When modeling regional policy diffusion effects, scholars have traditionally made appeals to both social learning and economic competition as causes of diffusion. In their empirical studies of policy adoption, however, they do not attempt to determine...
Drinking-and-Driving in America: A Test of Behavioral Assumptions Underlying Public Policy
Since the 1980s, states have increasingly used sanctions to deter people from drinking-and-driving, but the effectiveness of these policies is questionable. The use of sanctions as policy tools rests on deterrence theory, but little is known about the...
Feminist Nations? A Study of Native American Women in Southwestern Tribal Politics
Tremendous variation exists in the politics and governance of the over 550 federally recognized American Indian tribes. For example, women are barred from participating in tribal politics in most Pueblo Nations, yet in other Southwestern tribes, they...
Incumbent Contributions to the Congressional Campaign Committees, 1990-2000
House incumbents now regularly transfer significant sums of campaign money from their reelection accounts to the party campaign committees. This article conducts the first comprehensive exploration of this activity. After briefly reviewing the federal...
Multilateralism, Major Powers, and Militarized Disputes
American foreign policy has been animated by public debate between multilateralism and unilateralism in recent years. Some strains of traditional realist thinking suggest that major powers like the U.S. will naturally tend to be less enamored of multilateral...
Politics of Presence? Congresswomen and Symbolic Representation
Gender politics literature stresses the symbolic importance of electing more women to high-level political office. Despite references to the heightened legitimacy that women in politics bring to the political process, and the manner in which they affect...
Productivity in the Workplace: Cops, Culture, Communication, Cooperation, and Collusion
Both formal theory and experimental evidence have shown that repeated interactions among actors foster norms of trust and cooperation. But real-world empirical evidence regarding the substantive effects of repeated interaction is scant and fails to disentangle...
Purchasing Protection? the Effect of Political Spending on U.S. Trade Policy
The issue of whether or not money influences policymaking has been widely debated in American politics. While a direct link between money and policy outcomes has proven difficult to make, bureaucratic decisions on trade protection provide an opportunity...
The Timing of Presidential Nominations to the Lower Federal Courts
Presidents often move quite slowly to exercise their important power of judicial appointment. This study attempts to explain these delays by developing a strategic conception of the timing of presidential nominations to the lower federal courts. We argue...
Who Overvotes, Who Undervotes, Using Punchcards? Evidence from Los Angeles County
In this study we examine over- and undervotes from the November 2000 General Election in Los Angeles County. Los Angeles County is the nation's largest election jurisdiction, and it used a punchcard voting system in that election. We use precincts as...
Women in Executive Office: Variation across American States
The number of women serving in state-level executive office varies tremendously across the American states. Drawing upon a comparative politics framework developed by Pippa Norris and findings from analyses of women in U.S. state legislatures, we derive...

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