Political Research Quarterly

Articles from Vol. 51, No. 3, September

Attack Politics in Presidential Nomination Campaigns: An Examination of the Frequency and Determinants of Intermediated Negative Messages against Opponents
This article explores the negative campaign messages made by presidential nomination candidates on their opponents. Using a compilation of national and state media accounts of candidate attack activity from the 1992 Democratic nomination race, we seek...
Campaign Contributions in Local Elections
This study helps fill a gap in both the urban politics and campaign finance literatures by examining donation patterns for municipal elections in Atlanta and St. Louis. These local campaigns raised substantial amounts of money, much of it from suburban...
Divided Government and the Passage of Partisan Legislation, 1947-1990
Recent literature has provided some evidence that the presence of divided government does not affect the amount of significant legislation passed by Congress and enacted into law (Mayhew 1991). In this article, I argue that although there may not be...
Do Attitudes toward Specific Supreme Court Decisions Matter? the Impact of Webster and Texas V. Johnson on Public Confidence in the Supreme Court
In this article, we revisit the question of whether, and in what manner, attitudes regarding specific Supreme Court decisions influence subsequent levels of confidence in the Court itself. Analysis centers on the impact of the 1989 Webster abortion decision...
Explaining State Variation in Interparty Ideological Differences
This article uses two measures of state party ideology-a 1994 survey of state party committee members and a content analysis of state party platforms between 1990 and 1996-to determine variation between states in interparty ideological differences. These...
International Crises and Linkage Politics: The Experiences of the United States, 1953-1994
This study assesses the effects of U.S. involvement in international crises on the domestic popularity of American presidents for all major classes of voters. Using a time series analysis of monthly presidential approval and crisis involvement between...
Representative Bureaucracy: The Theoretical Implications of Statistical Interaction
This research extends our knowledge of the relationship between passive representative bureaucracy and active representative bureaucracy (Mosher 1968). We utilize data from the United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) to posit and...
Resurrecting the Pluralist Universe
Pluralism has seen a major revival in the recent theoretical literature. After years of thorough critique, a purge of sorts, and, finally, relative obscurity, political and social theorists have begun to resurrect pluralist themes, even if they often...
Why Do Party Activists Convert? an Analysis of Individual-Level Change on the Abortion Issue
The conversion of continuing party activists to new policy positions plays an important role in the process of partisan change. Although a number of scholars have shown that conversion among continuing activists at the aggregate level contributes to...
Wielding the Stick Instead of the Carrot: Labor PAC Punishment of Pro-NAFTA Democrats
Political action committees normally use contributions as a reward or inducement for access or favorable roll-call votes. In extreme cases, however, PACs may reduce funding as part of a punishment strategy. The rollcall vote on the North American Free...
Witnesses at the Confirmations? the Appearance of Organized Interests at Senate Hearings of Federal Judicial Appointments, 1945-1992
Previous research suggests that groups increasingly dominate the selection of federal court judges. We evaluate this conventional wisdom with longitudinal data tracing the appearance of organized interests at nearly 2,000 lower court confirmation hearings...

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