Political Research Quarterly

Articles from Vol. 55, No. 4, December

An Attributional Model of Economic Voting: Evidence from the 2000 Presidential Election
In this article we propose and test an attributional model of economic voting. Exploiting an innovative responsibility instrument to analyze the 2000 U.S. presidential election, we find that the incumbent party's candidate did benefit from the belief...
Bill Clinton's Approval Ratings: The More Things Change, the More They Stay the Same
Over the past three decades, political scientists have been developing general models of presidential approval ratings, seeking to determine the structure of aggregate approval. This endeavor has culminated in the broad claim that "peace, prosperity,...
Correction
CORRECTION In the June, 2002, issue of the Political Research Quarterly 55 (2), beginning on p. 457, appears a field essay entitled "Reading" "Methods" "Texts": How Research Methods Texts Construct Political Science authored by Peregrine Schwartz-Shea...
Culture, Institutions, and Urban Officials' Responses to Morality Issues
This article focuses on city officials' actions when morality issues (gay rights, pornography regulations, etc.) are at stake. Cases drawn from a systematic sample of cities reveal a continuum of local officials' actions ranging from actions unfavorable...
Examining Claims about Procedural Choice: The Use of Floor Waivers in the U.S. House
Congressional theories offer competing explanations of the role of restrictive amendment rules in the U.S. House (Krehbiel 1997; Dion and Huber 1996; Sinclair 1999). But this literature has largely ignored the importance of waivers in the legislative...
Gubernational and Senatorial Campaign Mobilization of Voters
This article examines the role of gubernatorial and U.S. Senate campaigns in mobilizing voters in the 1990, 1992, 1994, and 1996 elections. Merging contextual measures on these campaigns with data from the Voter Supplement Files of the November Current...
Regional Court Influence over Bureaucratic Policymaking: Courts, Ideological Preferences, and the Internal Revenue Service
While there have been numerous studies demonstrating bureaucratic control of administrative and regulatory agencies, many argue that the Internal Revenue Service is an agency out of control, and one not subject to political constraints. However, some...
The Effects of Independent Expenditures in Senate Elections
Independent expenditures are designed to influence the preferences and behavior of the electorate. Like candidate expenditures, the money is generally spent trying to persuade voters to act a certain way on election day Because of the continuous nature...
The Impact of Negative Campaigning: Evidence from the 1998 Senatorial Primaries
We investigate the amount of negative campaigning in the 1998 senatorial primaries and the ramifications of negative campaigning on primary turnout and general election outcomes. A large literature has developed to show whether primary divisiveness has...
When Might Institutions Change? Elite Support for Direct Democracy in Three Nations
Legislators typically control the design of political institutions, and can be expected to craft rules that work to their advantage. In some nations, however, legislators adopt provisions for direct democracy-an institution that might weaken the control...
Where You Live and What You Watch: The Impact of Racial Proximity and Local Television News on Attitudes about Race and Crime
In this article, we investigate the interaction of exposure to stereotype reinforcing local crime news and neighborhood racial context on attitudes about race and crime. To date, there has been little research investigating whether neighborhood context...
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