Political Research Quarterly

Articles from Vol. 61, No. 1, March

Ambition, Gender, and the Judiciary
With the work of scholars like Fox and Lawless (2004) and Sanbonmatsu (2002), the discipline of political science began to understand individual-level explanations for women's representation in state legislatures. Such analysis, however, has not been...
Charles Adrian and the Study of Nonpartisan Elections
The Progressives believed that political parties, especially those in the cities during the first part of the past century, undermined the quality of democracy in the country. The patronage that held the parties together led to corruption and inefficiencies....
Commentary on "Attitudes, Opportunities and Incentives: A Field Essay on Political Participation"
In "Attitudes, Opportunities and Incentives," I provided a critical review of both the theoretical issues and empirical evidence regarding the determinants and consequences of participation, emphasizing three points in conclusion. First, our participation...
Commentary on "Citizens by Choice, Voters by Necessity: Patterns in Political Mobilization by Naturalized Latinos"
The recent growth of the Latino population can be directly attributed to changes in U.S. immigration law in the mid-1960s. As the share of Latinos who were first-generation immigrants expanded from 20 percent in 1970 to 40 percent in 2000, questions...
Commentary on Emmy E. Werner's 1968 Article, "Women in the State Legislatures"
This commentary examines the contributions of Emmy W. Werner's classic article to the study of women and politics and to knowledge about women in state legislatures, placing the article in the context of its time and highlighting its continuing relevance.Keywords:...
Commentary on "Picking Federal Judges: A Note on Policy and Partisan Selection Agendas"
The news that "Picking Federal Judges," which I co-authored with Virginia Hettinger and Todd Peppers, was one of the most frequently cited articles published in Political Research Quarterly came as a surprise. While we, of course, thought the article...
Commentary on "Recruitment of Women to Public Office: A Discriminant Analysis," 1978
Growing out of an interest in why there were not more women in state legislatures, the author's 1978 article tested the explanation that a large part of the problem was the shortage of women in the eligibility pool. The article showed that more than...
Commentary on the 1991 Thomas and Welch Article "The Impact of Gender on Activities and Priorities of State Legislators"
Legislative advocacy in the early to mid-1980s in the California statehouse was the genesis for our Western Political Quarterly article (Thomas and Welch 1991) on the impact of women in legislatures. On behalf of California NOW and CARAL (the California...
Commentary on Welch's Early and Important Work Separating out the Effects of Constituency and Campaign Contributions on Congressional Roll-Call Votes
Writing mote than 20 years ago, W. P. Welch used a probit model to attempt to isolate the effect of campaign contributions on roll-call voting from other influences like the legislator's constituency, party, and ideology. The literature on the relationship...
Comment: The Dimensionality of Public Attitudes toward Government Spending
In "The Two Faces of Government Spending," Paul Goren applies a confirmatory factor model to data from the Center for Political Studies (CPS) National Election Studies (NES) to show that public attitudes toward policy spending are two dimensional. Here,...
Dimensionality Redux: A Rejoinder to Professor Jacoby
Professor Jacoby raises a number of important points in his comment on my study of public opinion on government spending. This rejoinder underscores why I believe the evidence warrants the conclusion that attitudes toward welfare spending are partially...
Does the Messenger Matter? Candidate-Media Agenda Convergence and Its Effects on Voter Issue Salience
Though research has shown that candidates and the media can influence the importance voters ascribe to political issues, little work has sought to test the interactive agenda-setting effects of each-in particular, to determine whether the ability of...
Economic Common Sense and the Depoliticization of the Economic
This article theorizes and begins to explore the extent to which academic and nonacademic discourses contribute to the reproduction and legitimacy of the economic status quo. The author argues that economic practices in the United States are often depoliticized...
International Relations, Domestic Politics, and Asylum Admissions in the United States
What explains variation in U.S. asylum approval rates across countries of origin? Previous research has found that humanitarian factors and diplomatic relations play an important role in shaping asylum decisions. This article examines the impact of domestic...
Is There a "Gender Affinity Effect" in American Politics?
Information, Affect, and Candidate Sex in U.S. House ElectionsA common assumption people make about American elections is that women voters will be the most likely source of support for female candidates, a phenomenon referred to as the "gender affinity...
Life, Pocketbook, or Culture: The Role of Perceived Security Threats in Promoting Exclusionist Political Attitudes toward Minorities in Israel
This article tests the role played by different sources of threat perception in shaping exclusionist political attitudes of the majority toward two distinct minority groups in Israel: non-Jewish immigrants from the former Soviet Union and Palestinian...
Reflections on Carol F. Goss's 1972 Article, "Military Committee Membership and Defense-Related Benefits in the House of Representatives"
Political science in the 1970s was influenced by the Vietnam War and its aftermath. Many scholars were concerned with the failure to end the war and the rising levels of defense spending in the face of pressing domestic needs. Only a dozen years earlier,...
The Effects of Redistricting on Voting Behavior in Incumbent U.S. House Elections, 1992-1994
Although numerous studies have assessed the influence of the 1990s redistricting on U.S. House elections, without exception, these published studies rely on aggregate data (e.g., district-level data). Likewise, the author uses aggregate data, but he...
The Importance of Being First
Twenty years ago, Wilma Rule (1987) published one of the first pieces that tested statistically a series of variables that might explain women's representation in national legislatures. Since its publication, "Electoral Systems, Contextual Factors and...
The Kennedy Experiment Revisited
Many of the critical issues and conflicts in international relations today bear a significant resemblance to the geopolitical circumstances that led to the development of a theorem the author published in these pages forty years ago. This theorem points...
The "Kling Thesis": An Early Effort at Systematic Comparative Politics
An entire generation of political scientists trained in the field of comparative politics with a Latin American specialization grew up reading the "Kling Thesis," as it was called (Kling 1956). I know: I am part of that generation. I first read Kling's...
The Two Faces of Government Spending
Scholars have known for some time that attitudes toward federal spending on welfare are shaped by racial antipathies. Are attitudes toward spending on nonwelfare social programs similarly grounded? This article explores the dimensionality of spending...
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