Political Research Quarterly

Articles from Vol. 61, No. 4, December

Campaign Advertisements' Impact on Voter Certainty and Knowledge of House Candidates' Ideological Positions
One expectation for American election campaigns is that they inform citizens about candidates' policy inclinations, clarifying the policy directions advocated by the major party nominees. Evidence from the 1998 elections to the House of Representatives...
Courts and the Puzzle of Institutional Stability and Change: Administrative Drift and Judicial Innovation in the Case of Asbestos
The institutional development literature has begun to move beyond the concept of punctuated equilibrium and consider how the forces of stability and change interact. A central theme involves drift-the shifting of the effect of stable institutions through...
Do Abortion Attitudes Lead to Party Switching?
The notion that issues and ideology can move partisanship remains controversial. The authors explore the stronger claim that issues can lead people to switch political parties and whether the effect of abortion attitudes is asymmetrical (i.e., abortion...
Fairly Balanced: The Politics of Representation on Government Advisory Committees
The United States Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA) requires advisory committees to be "fairly balanced." By examining legislative, judicial, and administrative interpretations of FACA's balance requirement, this article identifies a prevailing double...
Free Advertising: How the Media Amplify Campaign Messages
The impact of political ads paid for by candidates is amplified because of the free media coverage they receive. Yet how frequently does that occur? And are certain types of ads more likely to be covered? To answer these questions, we performed a content...
"Interest" Is a Verb: Arthur Bentley and the Language of Interest
The hundredth anniversary of Arthur Bentley's The Process of Government is an occasion to recover his distinctive but forgotten view of interest, namely, that an appeal to "interest" is an activity of provoking political identity and agency - an activity...
Partisan-Ideological Divergence and Changing Party Fortunes in the States, 1968-2003: A Federal Perspective
We expand on previous literature on party competition in the American states by examining competition for both state and national offices. We find significant differences in Democratic Party electoral advantage within states, along with across-state...
Reconstructing the "Problem" of Race
How should the "problem" of race be conceptualized? This essay attempts to widen our understanding of the problem of race in American political discourse by examining its productive function in grounding the meaning of American liberalism. By tracing...
Restricted Authority: Slavery Politics, Internal Improvements, and the Limitation of National Administrative Capacity
This article connects slavery politics with the curtailment of antebellum infrastructure policy and the limits placed on the development of the early American state. Because many Southerners feared that a unified Northern majority could hinder slavery's...
Rethinking Race in American Politics
This piece introduces the four articles in this issue's minisymposium by explaining how they fit in with an emerging body of scholarship that places race centrally in asking and answering questions about American political development. The author identifies...
Strange Bedfellows? Polarized Politics? the Quest for Racial Equity in Contemporary America
Some scholars see contemporary American politics as characterized by "strange bedfellows" on racial issues and by polarization driven by economic, not racial, views. The authors argue instead that on most issues with racial dimensions, political actors...
Whiteness and the Polarization of American Politics
Scholars tend to agree that American politics has become polarized along partisan and ideological lines, yet the causes of polarization are in much dispute. The author argues that polarization and the culture wars are a consequence, in part, of the changing...
Why Do Governors Issue Vetoes? the Impact of Individual and Institutional Influences
Studies of presidential veto use advance two competing theoretical perspectives: the "president-centered" approach and the "presidency-centered" approach. We assess the applicability of these approaches to gubernatorial veto activity. Our analysis of...
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