Political Research Quarterly

Articles from Vol. 57, No. 3, September

Changing Patterns of Obligation and the Emergence of Individualism in American Political Thought
Students of American political thought have long noted changes in the goals pursued by colonial American communities. Relations between Americans and their communities, previously characterized by security and peaceful existence were transformed into...
Collective Action, Pluralism, and the Legitimacy Tariff: Corporate Activity or Inactivity in Politics
Despite the fact that domestic and foreign corporations, along with trade associations, are some of the most politically active groups in the United States, earlier research has identified a substantial number of firms that are politically inactive....
Divided or Together? Conflict and Cooperation between African Americans and Latinos
This article examines the political relationships between Latinos and African Americans in 194 multiracial school districts. The empirical results indicate that at times the relationship between Latinos and African Americans is competitive and at times...
Incumbency and Short-Term Influences on Voters
Using NES surveys from 1980 through 2000, this article examines the incumbency advantage with a series of survey reports of the vote, an approach that departs from the convention of estimating the incumbent advantage with aggregate election returns....
Internationalism in Congress
This article explores the conditions under which Congress supports U.S. involvement in international affairs. While Presidents have tended to support internationalist foreign policies, Congress, pre-occupied with district and state-level concerns, has...
Public Opinion, Public Policy, and Organized Interests in the American States
This article examines whether organized interests alter the strong opinion-policy linkage observed by Erikson, Wright, and McIver (1993). We first replicate the EWM model circa 1980 with the addition of measures of interest organization density and diversity...
Tests of Vote-Buyer Theories of Coalition Formation in Legislatures
Formal theories of "vote-buying" aim to explain legislative coalition building, and lobbying. While anecdotal evidence suggests that something approximating vote-buying occurs, these theories have not been subjected to substantial empirical tests. Using...
The Dynamics of Issue Ownership in Presidential Campaigns
This effort examines the dynamics of the agenda-setting process in presidential campaigns by assessing the conditions that motivate candidates to discuss issues associated with their opponents party. The article's argument contends that occurrences of...
The New Hampshire Effect in Presidential Nominations
In order to demonstrate challenges to conventional wisdom (Aldrich 1980a, b; Bartels 1985 1988; Orren and Polsby 1987), this article develops several forecasting models of the presidential primary vote to compare to a baseline model of the aggregate...
The Question of Committee Bias Revisited
This study revisits the question of whether committees are biased in their policy outputs-pursuing policies at odds with noncomniittee members. We find evidence that committees in the House are biased: Most committees are either more divided than the...
Trust and Social Bonds: Faith in Others and Policy Outcomes Reconsidered*
Rodney Hero (2003) argues that advocates of social capital may have been too optimistic about its impact on public policy. Hero argues that states with high levels of social capital generally have worse outcomes for minority groups rather than better...
War Casualties, Policy Positions, and the Fate of Legislators
Politicians appear to anticipate that the public will hold them accountable for war deaths. Yet, little is known about why some politicians openly oppose costly conflicts while others do not and the difference this makes to their electoral fortunes....
What's an "Anomaly"? or, How and How Much Theoretical Traditions Matter
I appreciate that Professor Uslaner has taken my research and arguments seriously, to the point of penning a formal response. He makes several claims and criticisms. With respect to my paper specifically, I think two points are relevant; the others seem...
Women, War, and Winning Elections: Gender Stereotyping in the Post-September 11th Era
Scores of political science studies reveal that female candidates fare as well as their male counterparts. But the percentage of citizens willing to support a woman presidential party nominee has significantly decreased over the last two years. Based...
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