Humanities

Bimonthly magazine providing review of notable humanities projects and developments.

Articles from Vol. 21, No. 3, May/June

A Feast for the Senses
the Plains Indian Museum is celebrating its makeover with a splash of tradition. For the June 17 opening day, "well have a powwow and a buffalo feast to honor the great cooperation we've had from the tribes," says curator Emma Hansen. The museum, part...
Big Top in a Small Town
The young African American man politely asked, "Do you believe that I'm inferior, Mr. Jefferson?" Clay Jenkinson, in the guise of the Founding Father, was standing in front of an audience at Thomas Jefferson High School in Denver. "I just wanted to rip...
Dvorak and America
In September 1892 the Czech composer Antonin Dvorak came to America with his wife, their eldest son, and daughter. A simple man who for for decades had lived modestly, Dvorak had been recognized as a major composer only a few years before. The promise...
From Slavery to Scottsboro: Making a Media Fund Work
Since its creation in 1990, the Southern Humanities Media Fund has provided more than $1.1 million in production grants to thirty-five film, television, and radio projects, many of which have aired nationally and won awards. "We look for projects that...
Grass Roots Humanities
"I have fallen in love with American names," the poet Stephen Vincent Benet once wrote. "The sharp names that never get fat/ The snakeskin titles of mining claims/The plumed war bonnet of Medicine Hat/ Tucson and Deadwood and Lost Mule Flat." Thirty...
In Focus: Jane Hood of Nebraska
As director of Nebraska's Humanities Council, Jane Hood is confronting two tough issues. The first is ensuring the financial future of the state humanities council. The second addresses the role that the state council can play to alleviate the isolation...
On Site with NEH
Several students rushed up to Joy Hakim as she entered their eighth-grade classroom at Phifer Middle School in Pennsauken, New Jersey. They thrust their history notebooks before her, asking for her autograph. One student lifted his textbook, A History...
Putting an Old House to a New Use
A GRAND, HISTORIC RESIDENCE THAT WAS ONCE USED to house wounded Civil War soldiers has been saved from demolition and will now be put to a new use. The West Virginia Humanities Council purchased the Hubbard House in Charleston, West Virginia, last year...
State by State
A Roundup of Activities Sponsored by State Humanities Councils ALABAMA Lectures, discussions, and symposiums are under way all over Alabama this May and June, among them an Alabama Writer's Symposium in Monroeville, May 4-6, sponsored by the Alabama...
Streetwise Socrates
THE POOR IN AMERICA get job skills-that's all," writer Earl Shorris says with an edge. "But the poor deserve an education in the humanities every bit as much as the rich and are as capable of enjoying it. They just don't get the chance." To even the...
Taking the Humanities to the People: A Conversation with James F. Veninga
Thirty years ago the Endowment embarked on a new direction: The story of the State Councils As the state humanities councils marked their anniversaries NEH Chariman William R. Ferris talked about culture in the public arena with James F. Veninga, who...
The Imperfect Eye of Edward Curtis
In 1900, photographer Edward Curtis traveled to Montana to witness a Regan Sun Dance. As the Indians made offerings to the sun against a stark prairie landscape, Curtis was intensely moved. He thought it might be the last of its kind. The ceremony had...
Vera (Mrs. Vladimir Nabokov)
LOLITA OWES HER BIRTH TO NABOKOV but her life to Vera; she was several times nearly incinerated in Ithaca. The manuscript came close to meeting its demise as early as the fall of 1948, when Vladimir made a trip to the trash barrel behind the Seneca Street...