Humanities

Bimonthly magazine providing review of notable humanities projects and developments.

Articles from Vol. 32, No. 1, January/February

A Fish Story
CALIFORNIA AROUND 1991, FISHBONE WAS POISED TO ASCEND the greatest heights of American popular music. Few bands so daring came this dose. Fishbone wasn't punk, funk, reggae, or heavy metal, and yet it was-frenetically, amazingly-all these things at once....
After Shock
MAlNE JUST LIKE ODYSSEUS, MODERN SOLDIERS CAN have long journeys recovering from painful injuries and memories. But their healers, too, can suffer from burnout and exhaustion. At After Shock: Humanities Perspectives on Trauma, a conference organized...
A Homepage for PHILOSOPHY
In late 2004, Larry Sanger, who cofounded the online encyclopedia Wikipedia in early 2001 only to leave the venture a year later, wrote that his creation suffered from a "lack of public perception of credibility." In an article titled "Why Wikipedia...
Akhmatova's Boswell
From the early 1980s until around 2000, there was a publishing explosion of Russian diaries and memoirs recalling Stalin's Terror and World War IL After glasnost the trend continued but has now subsided. "This moment," writes Irina Paperno in Stories...
Around the Nation
A Roundup of Activities Sponsored by the State Humanities CouncilsFLORIDAHistorian Vibert White Jr. presents "Dangerous Occupations: Pullman Porters of Florida" at Historic Pensacola Village on Jan. 15.GEORGIA"Hands that Can Do: African-American Quilters...
A Sculpted Landscape
Sculptures of many dimensions, styles, and materials mingle with students, faculty, and visitors across a college campus where living with art is a serendipitous extracurricular activity.The sunlight in Collegeville, Pennsylvania, can suddenly glance...
Bedtime Stories
Did you hear the one about the Japanese villagers who performed burial rights for an American World War II pilot by following the text of James Joyce's Finnegans Wake7 Or the one about how a refrigerator full of eclectic food stashed for his wife's prayer...
Calendar
Endowment-Supported EventsJanuary/February"An American Turning Point: The Civil War in Virginia" on view at the Virginia Historical Society February 4 to December 31, examines the concepts of freedom, liberty, patriotism, and nation through the stories...
"Daybreak Gray and Dim"
How the Civil War Changed Walt Whitman's PoetryBy the fall of 1861, Whitman had come to believe he needed to do something for the war effort. His first act was to contribute a patriotic broadside that appeared simultaneously in the Boston Daily Evening...
Digging across Panama
THE PANAMA CANAL MARKED A TRANSITION: from the great public works of classical Egypt, Rome, and China, built by backbreaking labor, to the far more mechanized triumphs of the twentieth century. And as a monument to optimism and national pride, only the...
Editor's Note
Many of us will contemplate the Civil War during the sesquicentennial, and Randall Fuller inaugurates the proceedings with a study of how the war changed the poetry of Walt Whitman. Writing verse that echoed the drums of war in 1861, Whitman envisioned...
Enchanting Reality: World's Fairs during the Depression
Every day, during the first six-month run of the 1939 New York World's Fair, lines of well-dressed men, women and children formed on the ramps outside the sleek General Motors pavilion. And then, during the fair's second season in 1940, it was déjà vu:...
In Focus: Montana's Ken Egan
KEN EGAN GREW UP THE FIFTH OF SEVEN CHILDREN to a high school English teacher father and a writer mother, "We siblings were always having elaborate literary arguments," says Egan, who met me on a snowy November day on the University of Montana campus...
Medical Assurance
In the NEH-supported American Nursing: A History of Knowledge, Authority, and the Meaning of Work by Patricia D'Antonio, and published by Johns Hopkins University Press in 2010, we Learn of the tortuous path the profession took from the nineteenth-century...
Mo Yan 101
SOMETIME IN THE LATE 1960s or early seventies, a neighbor told Guan Moye about a writer he knew whose work was so popular that he could afford to eat jiaozi - "those tasty little pork dumplings" - at every meal. For Guan, who was born in 1955 in the...
Southern Exposure
ALABAMA BEFORE PUBLISHING HER FIRST STORY, Eudora Welty was an accomplished photographer. In the early to mid 1930s, Welty began lobbying photographers and publishers alike in New York in hope of finding an outlet for both her words and pictures. In...
The Confessional Culture
A LITTLE MORE THAN A CENTURY AGO, admitting that one was addicted to alcohol or drugs was akin to confessing to a horrible crime. Addicts existed on the margins of society, either shunted off to asylums for inebriates or banished to prisons where they...
The Last Newton Magician
(ProQuest: ... denotes formulae omitted.)Precisely at 1 p.m., just after luncheon on July 13, 1936, bidding opened on a remarkable lot at Sotheby's auction house in London: a metal chest full of Isaac Newton's private, handwritten papers and lab books,...
The Real Mo Yan
NEH Chairman Jim Leach interviewed author Mo Yan in October during the Second U.S.-China Cultural Forum at the University of California-Berkeley. At the conclusion of the conference, Chairman Leach and the Chinese Vice Minister of Culture, Wang Wenzhang,...
The Very Hungry Reader
MASSACHUSETTS IN 1966, ERIC CARLE DESIGNED A FULL-PAGE advertisement for Chlor-Trimeton Repetabs that featured a lobster and the caption "When yesterday's indulgence becomes today's allergy." Carle had yet to illustrate a children's book, but the tissue-paper...
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