Humanities

Bimonthly magazine providing review of notable humanities projects and developments.

Articles from Vol. 26, No. 6, November/December

An Encounter with Tolstoy
IN APRIL OF 1896, JANE ADDAMS TOOK A BREAK FROM HER SETTLEMENT in Chicago, Hull-House, and visited Europe for four months with her friend, Mary Rozet Smith, and Smith's parents. Unable to travel without a purpose, Addams set three goals for herself....
"A Plucky Thing to Do": Jane Addams Befriends the Workers
In 1889 Chicago was no ordinary metropolis but the second largest city in the United States and the sixth largest in the world. Economically, socially, and politically, it was a dynamo. With the establishment of their settlement house, Hull-House, Jane...
A Roundup of Activities
Sponsored by the State Humanities CouncilsARIZONAThe Community Food Bank in Tucson will open "Fields to Tables" on November 15. The exhibition will combine photography and oral histories that explore the impact of history, culture, language, and literature...
Becoming American
A Vietnamese girl brings a lotus seed with her when her family flees to America; a Mexican boy adapt to a new culture in Sacramento, California; and a group of Norwegian farmers defy the hardships of the Dakotas to start a new life.These stories are...
Black Hands, Blue Seas
YEARS BEFORE FREDERICK DOUGLASS BECAME a noted abolitionist and orator, he would stand outside his owner's house by the Chesapeake Bay, observing the ships that traveled through the harbor. He wrote in his autobiography, "I would pour out my soul's complaint,...
Bridging Two Worlds
A CONVERSATION WITH BETTE BAO LORDNEH CHAIRMAN BRUCE COLE TALKED RECENTLY WITH AUTHOR BETTE BAO LORD ABOUT THE ROLE OF DIFFERENT CULTURES IN SHAPING AMERICA. LORD, WHO CAME TO THIS COUNTRY FROM SHANGHAI WHEN SHE WAS EIGHT, HAS WRITTEN ABOUT THAT HERITAGE...
Creating Main Street
IN DECEMBER 1930, Sinclair Lewis became the first American to receive the Nobel Prize for Literature. The award cited "his vigorous and graphic art of description and his ability to create, with wit and humor, new types of characters," among them George...
Democracy in Action: Alaska Remembers Its Path to Statehood
On June 30, 1958, the Anchorage Times proclaimed "WE'RE IN" in letters six-and-a-half inches high. The U.S. Senate had followed the House of Representatives in approving the Alaska Statehood Act, and news of the vote was broadcast live across the territory....
DISCOVERING ST. AUGUSTINE: America's Oldest European City
WHILE LEARNING ABOUT SPANISH colonialism in Florida, middle school students can investigate the eerie tale of a ghost named Catalina.According to legend, Catalina was a Spanish colonist living in St. Augustine, Florida, during the French and Indian War....
Editor's Note
BECOMING AMERICAN"The magic of America is much more than the sum of its comparative advantages. It is that idea that Americans can be as different as sisters and brothers are and still be part of the same family." The words are those of Bette Bao Lord,...
From Battlefield to Bungalow: The Adaptable Architecture of the Quonset
"Draw a picture of a house," the big sister instructed the younger one, and the little girl's sketch was remarkably accurate. Her drawing was not the predictable A-frame with requisite chimney and smoke, but a squat, domed structure with striped siding....
George Marshall: An American for All Seasons
AT THE ANNUAL HEROES OF HISTORY LECTURE, JOSIAH BUNTING III TALKED ABOUT THE LIFE OF GENERAL GEORGE C. MARSHALL, WHO WON THE NOBEL PEACE PRIZE IN 1953 FOR HIS EFFORTS IN THE POST-WORLD WAR II EUROPEAN RECOVERY THAT BECAME KNOWN AS THE MARSHALL PLAN....
In Focus: Wisconsin's Dean Bakopoulos
DEAN BAKOPOULOS leads a double lifeas the executive director of the Wisconsin Humanities Council and as an up-and-coming novelist. Last February he published his first novel, Please Don't Come Back from the Moon."It's exciting for me to be able to create...
New Orleans: Letters from Tennessee Williams
IN DECEMBER OF 1938, twenty-seven-year-old Thomas Lanier Williams left St. Louis for New Orleans. En route, he stopped in Memphis to visit his grandparents and to send several plays to New York to the Group Theatre's contest for young writers. He subtracted...
Rebuilding in the Gulf
TEN EMERGENCY GRANTS OF UP TO $30,000 each have been awarded to restore hurricane-damaged collections in the Gulf Coast States. The collections range from rare sixteenth-century bibles at the Notre Dame Seminary Library in New Orleans to regional twentieth-century...
The Woman Who Would Be King
THE WOMAN WHO WOULD BE KINGThe story of Hatshepsut is a remarkable one. She led armies and trade expeditions, built one of the greatest monuments in Egypt, and switched her appearance from female to male in order to rule as pharaoh. In a fundamentally...

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