Humanities

Bimonthly magazine providing review of notable humanities projects and developments.

Articles from Vol. 23, No. 2, March/April

A Festival of African American Poetry
DREAM EXPLOSION Fifty years ago Langston Hughes asked in a poem, "What happens to a dream deferred?" In response to that question, a poetry festival in St. Louis, Missouri, is calling itself "Dream Explosion." It draws African American poets and performers...
Around the Nation: A Roundup of Activities
Sponsored by State Humanities Councils ARIZONA The seven-state traveling exhibition, "Moving Waters: The Colorado River and the West" continues at the John Wesley Powell Memorial Museum in Page, Arizona. A six-part radio documentary, a book discussion...
Crocodiles and Canoes
Water spirits come to life in Niger Delta masks and headdresses. AS THE COASTLINE of West Africa curves eastward below the Sahara Desert, the Niger River rises just behind the first range of hills, not two hundred miles from the sea. It flows northeast...
Editor's Note
HENRY LOUIS GATES, JR. "I've always thought of myself as both a literary historian and a literary critic," says Henry Louis Gates, Jr., "someone who loves archives and someone who is dedicated to resurrecting texts that have dropped out of sight." Gates,...
Ex Libris
BOOKS PUBLISHED RECENTLY WITH NEH SUPPORT A list of Endowment-supported books based on research by Anne Lopez-Buitrago, Margaret Scymser, and Russell Wyland. AWARD WINNERS American Association of Museums Design Competition for Exhibition Publications,...
In Focus: Washington's Margaret Ann Bollmeier
"Digital media is so compelling and pervasive in our society that the humanities will have to embrace this technology or it's going to be left behind," says Margaret Ann Bollmeier. Believing in Film, video, and the Internet as increasingly important...
In His Own Words
Colored People: A Memoir A letter from Henry Louis Gates, Jr. to his daughters Maggie and Lisa I enjoy the unselfconscious moments of a shared cultural intimacy, whatever form they take, when no one else is watching, when no white people are around....
Master of the Skyscraper: Louis Sullivan
A BUILDING constructed in St. Louis at the end of the nineteenth century made Louis Sullivan the master of skyscraper design. It was a ten-story box, as all rental "skyscrapers" were at the time, but it showed its bones as no office building had before....
Noteworthy
WE THE PEOPLE A new initiative spans all the funding programs at the National Endowment for the Humanities. The We the People initiative challenges humanities educators, scholars, professionals, and cultural institutions to enhance Americans' knowledge...
Resurrecting the Texts: A Conversation with Henry Louis Gates, Jr
HARVARD PROFESSOR AND CULTURAL CRITIC Henry Louis Gates, Jr. is this year's Jefferson Lecturer in the Humanities. He spoke recently with NEH Chairman Bruce Cole about the growth of African American studies in this country. Gates, who is WE.B. Du Bois...
Safe Harbor Fugitives among Friends
In February of 1854, New Bedford merchant Andrew Robeson asked a neighbor in Fall River for a favor-he needed help in hiding a man on the run, identity unknown. The man had come from Norfolk, Virginia by vessel. By that time slaveholders in more than...
Voices of the Slave Trade
"And when we found ourselves at last taken away, death was more preferable than life, and a plan was concerted amongst us that we might burn and blow up the ship, and to perish all together in the flames." OTTOBAH CUGOANO DESCRIBES THIS SCENE OF rebellion...
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