Humanities

Bimonthly magazine providing review of notable humanities projects and developments.

Articles from Vol. 26, No. 3, May/June

A Roundup of Activities
ALABAMAThe eighth annual Alabama Writers Symposium will be held in Monroeville, May 5 through 7. This year's symposium, titled "Alabama Wild," will highlight native scholars and writers, including Pulitzer Prize-winners Edward O. Wilson, On Human Nature,...
Clash of Empires
How the FRENCH AND INDIAN WAR REDREW THE MAP of NORTH AMERICAIN THE SPRING OF 1754, A TWENTY-TWO-YEAR-OLD OFFICER NAMED GEORGE WASHINGTON led a small group of soldiers over the Allegheny Mountains. The Virginia militia's mission was peaceful: to construct...
Editor's Note
The Jefferson Lecturer"In my soul I'm an ancient Greek," Donald Kagan has said. "The Greeks are more immediately relevant than anything in between."Kagan has been teaching the virtues of the Greeks for the past thirty-five years at Yale University, where...
From the Ground Up: Khrushchev Wins the Peasants
Stalin's Viceroy: 1931-1941When Stalin first assigned Khrushchev to Ukraine he noted his protege's "weakness for cities and industry" and warned him "not to spend all of your time in the Donbas" at the expense of "your agricultural responsibilities."...
Oklahoma's Anita May
When Anita May became director of the Oklahoma Humanities Council in 1976, her goal was to bring Oklahomans as many humanities programs as there were Friday night football games. "People didn't even know what the humanities were," says May. "One of our...
ON BASEBALL IN THE FIFTIES: In His Own Words
It was a time of heroic greatness and consistent excellence, when dynasties were challenged by other dynasties. The war between the Yankees and Dodgers extended from 1947 through 1956, a decade-the very length of the war between the Greeks and Trojans....
ON DEMOCRACY: In His Own Words
Ancient and modern critics of democracy have shared a basic attitude.Both have distrusted the ordinary person and overridden his autonomy in search of a higher goal: autopian idea of justice. For Plato, that meant government by a small group of philosophers...
On Learning from the Greeks
NEH Chairman Bruce Cole spoke recently with this year's Jefferson Lecturer, Donald Kagan, about the teaching of history. Kagan has taught at Yale for thirty-six years and is the author of eleven books, among them his four-volume magisterial work, THE...
ON PRESENT DANGERS: In His Own Words
America is in danger. Unless its leaders change their national security policy, the peace and safety its power and influence have ensured since the end of the Cold War will disappear. Already, increasing military weakness and confusion about foreign...
ON THE ORIGINS OF WAR: In His Own Words
Our study of the episodes examined here suggests some general observations about the origins of wars and the preservation of peace. The first is that in a world of sovereign states a contest among them over the distribution of power is the normal condition...
ON THE PELOPONNESIAN WAR: In His Own Words
From the perspective of the fifth-century Greeks the Peloponnesian War was legitimately perceived as a world war, causing enormous destruction of life and property, intensifying factional and class hostility, and dividing the Greek states internally...
ON THUCYDIDES: In His Own Words
Thucydides stood on the edge of philosophy. He was sufficiently a historian to feel compelled to establish the particulars, to present the data as accurately as he could, but he was no less, and perhaps more, concerned to convey the general truths that...
Pentimento: Veterans' Memories of Vietnam
On a whim, Martin Tucker decided to try tracking down Vietnam veterans to use some of their photographs in teaching his darkroom class. "That's my generation, and I thought I could teach my students darkroom techniques while they absorbed a little history,"...
Prizes
This spring brings a bumper crop of prizes, among them two Peabodys, two Bancrofts, and two in interactive media."Studio 360 American Icons: Melville's Moby-Oick" has won a George Foster Peabody Award from the University of Georgia's Grady College of...
The Scholar and Teacher
I FIRST MET DONALD KAGAN IN THE FALL OF 1974 WHEN I ARRIVED AT YALE to begin the doctoral program in ancient history. Perhaps "met" is not quite the right word: although not yet the nationally known figure he is today, Kagan was already a phenomenon....
Unlocking the Power of Myth
THE ANCIENT CITY OF TROY HAS ENDURED THROUGH the human imagination. Abandoned in the fifth century CE. and not rediscovered until the 1870s, the city for centuries seemed no more real than Camelot or Valhalla.No one knows exactly why the Trojan War was...

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