Humanities

Bimonthly magazine providing review of notable humanities projects and developments.

Articles from Vol. 23, No. 1, January/February

A Language Learned a Culture Preserved
A room full of squirming schoolchildren have a special treat at the Riverton School in Portland, Maine-- a bilingual story time. After reading the story of "The Lion and the Mouse" in English, Joy Ahrens turns the floor over to a Somali woman sitting...
Around the Nation: A Roundup of Activities
ALABAMA The first annual Alabama Humanities Summit will be held January 17 and 18 on the campus of Huntingdon College in Montgomery. Public programmers from museums, libraries, schools, community leadership groups, tourism boards, and newspapers across...
A Suffragist Gets Cranky
THE PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION OF 1872 brought together an improbable convergence of notables: the first woman candidate, a newspaper editor, and Ulysses S. Grant, military hero and incumbent. In what seemed a counterintuitive move, Susan B. Anthony and the...
Eavesdropping on a Generation: Yiddish Broadcast from the Golden Age of Radio
IN 1938 IN BERLIN, SIEGBERT FREIBERG, A TWELVE-E[AR-OLD JEWISH BOY, saw his father taken away by the Nazis and sent to Buchenwald. Fortunately, not long after, his stepmother was able to get her husband released and he escaped to Shanghai, leaving his...
Editor's Note
A new chairman has arrived at the National Endowment for the Humanities. He is Bruce Cole, an art historian from Indiana University. In this issue of Humanities, we talk with him about his views on history and art and what lies ahead for the Endowment....
"From Skyscrapers to Barns and Everything in Between"
VIRGINIA'S MOST ENDURING LEGACY LIES IN ITS architecture, says Richard Guy Wilson, a professor at the University of Virginia, far more than through painting, literature, or any other traditional art form. He mentions Mount Vernon and Monticello as two...
In Focus: A New Awareness in New York
Like so many others, David Cronin and his colleagues at the New York Council for the Humanities spent much of September 11 on the phone trying to find each other. Theirs is a small office-only eight people including the part-timers-just one block from...
Of Poets, Prophets, and Politics
opening a window into arab culture IN THE TOWN OF AL-BASRAH IN IRAQ, POETS gather every year for a poetry festival, just as they did fourteen centuries ago. In Cairo every Friday, people come together at the shrine of Ibn al-Farid, a thirteenth-century...
Perspectives
IN DECEMBER, BRUCE COLE WAS SWORN IN AS THE EIGHTH CHAIRMAN OF THE NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES. HE SPEAKS WITH EDITOR MARY LOU BEATTY ABOUT HIS ACADEMIC CAREER AND HIS VIEWS ON THE HUMANITIES. Q: You're beginning a new chapter after twenty-eight...
Thaw of the Ice Curtain
DARLENE ORR IS AN AMERICAN YUP'IK who grew up in the village of Gambell on St. Lawrence Island, Alaska. "I heard stories of the other Siberian Yup'ik, people who lived in the forbidding Soviet Union," she says. "But nothing that I heard prepared me for...
The Long Shadow of Invisible Man
I AM AN INVISIBLE MAN. No, I am not a spook like those who haunted Edgar Allan Poe; nor am I one of your Hollywood-movie ectoplasms. I am a man of substance, of flesh and bone, fiber and liquids-and I might even be said to possess a mind. I am invisible,...
The Reluctant Cadet
Even Ulysses S. Grant believed that he was an unlikely military hero. I won't go," said seventeen-year-old Ulysses when his overbearing father announced his impending appointment to the United States Military Academy at West Point. Jesse Grant had settled...
The Rise and Fall of Ulysses S. Grant
IN LESS THAN TWO decades, Ulysses S. Grant made and lost a fortune, was spurned as a drunken fool, and saluted as a national hero. The peaks and valleys in the life of the man who became the winning general of the Civil War and then the eighteenth president...

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