Humanities

Bimonthly magazine providing review of notable humanities projects and developments.

Articles from Vol. 24, No. 2, March/April

Alaska's Ira Perman
Bridging City and Native CulturesThe day after graduating from Boston University with a theater degree in 1975, Ira Perman hopped in his 1965 VW Microbus, with twenty-eight windows and no heater, and set forth across the continent on a "personal journey."...
A Silken Path to Trade
TWO GLAZED earthenware rooster-headed ewers, one from Tang Dynasty China and one from thirteenth-century Iran, now stand side by side in a new exhibition, evoking the long and complex story of the relationship between trade and Asian art. The ewers'...
Breaching the Great Wall
How the Manchu Took ChinaEMPEROR KANGXI CAME TO POWER IN A TURBULENT TIME. HIS PEOPLE, the Manchu, had come down from the hills to defend the Ming dynasty in 1644-but once they rid China of its attackers, they refused to leave.Under Kangxi and his successors,...
Changing the Channel: A Conversation with Brian Lamb
BRUCE COLE: I'm a longtime admirer and it's an honor to meet you. I taught at Indiana University for many years. You're from Indiana as well, right?BRIAN LAMB: First twenty-two years of my life.COLE: You went to school there.LAMB: I went to Purdue, the...
Council Changes
Nine new members joined the National Council for the Humanities in February. Council members are appointed by the president and confirmed by the Senate to serve a six-year term.Jewel Spears Brooker is a professor of literature at Eckerd College and has...
Editor's Note
NATIONAL HUMANITIES MEDALISTSIn this issue we honor some exemplary people who have been selected by the President to receive National Humanities Medals for their achievements.Among them are a professor of classics and history, Donald Kagan, and a television...
From Back Roads to Big City
BY 1937 FRED MADDOX had grown tired of picking fruit and cotton and decided to try show business. He and his family had ridden the rails from Alabama to central California in search of better fortunes. "We sold everything we had, we sold our two mules,...
New Orleans Changes Hands: The Struggle to Influence in the New World
THE CITY OF New Orleans belonged to three different nations during the course of 1803.It had been a prize pawn between vying European powers ever since the Seven Years War, when France ceded it to the Spanish in order to keep it out of enemy British...
Prague: Saving the Books
IN AUGUST 2002 THE WORLD WATCHED AS floodwaters poured across central Europe, causing hundreds of millions of dollars worth of damage, displacing hundreds of thousands of residents, and submerging centuries of cultural treasures.Among the cities worst...
State by State
A ROUNDUP OF ACTIVITIES SPONSORED BY THE STATE HUMANITIES COUNCILSCompiled by Amy LifsonARIZONAPhoenix's first public library, now called the Carnegie Library, is the site for the Arizona Book Festival on April 5. More than one hundred exhibitors and...
"The Idea of America"
A Seventeen-Year-Old Speaks OutAS PART OF THE "WE THE PEOPLE" INITIATIVE, NEH INVITED HIGH SCHOOL JUNIORS ACROSS THE COUNTRY TO PARTICIPATE IN AN ESSAY CONTEST ON THE IDEA OF AMERICA-TO EXPLORE WHAT IT IS THAT CONNECTS US AS A NATION. MORE THAN THIRTEEN...
The Unknown Cold War
Students and Teachers Get a Glimpse behind the Iron CurtainTHE MODERNIZING OF CHINA AND the dissolution of the Soviet Union over the last two decades have led to the release of hundreds of millions of pages of formerly top-secret archival documents....