Humanities

Bimonthly magazine providing review of notable humanities projects and developments.

Articles from Vol. 19, No. 5, September/October

A Conversation with Judy Crichton: Documenting the American Experience
Judy Crichton began her career in broadcasting at the age of eleven at her father's radio station. Her work since that time as a reporter, director, and producer for ABC, CBS and PBS has brought her a number of awards, including the Alfred L. duPont-columbia...
A New Chautauqua Reader
The Great Plains Chautauqua Society has published a new book, a reader on thirty-one historical figures of the Progressive Era. "We want to encourage people to look at some of the seminal voices from the turn of the century, the beginning of the twentieth...
A Writer's Writer
I DON'T IMAGINE I'll ever be a popular writer," wrote Katherine Anne Porter to her father in 1931. "I simply want to be free to say what I feel and think exactly as I am ableleave my testament, if you like, offer my evidence of what I found in this life...
Built in a Day
Capturing the Era of Catalog Architecture The Aladdin catalog tempted would-be homeowners with dream homes they could build themselves. These were affordable homes for the average American, but they carried upscale names: the Jasmine, the Brentwood,...
Chicago's Encyclopedia Tells the Urban Story
The city of Chicago resonates through American history. From Mrs. O'Leary's cow to basketball's Michael Jordan, the quirks and characters of Chicago fire our national imagination. Did Eliot Ness and his Untouchables really bring down Al Capone? What...
Crossroads of Conflict
EXPLORING THE LEGACY OF THE U.S.MEXICAN WAR CENTURY AND A HALF AGO, THE UNITED STATES AND MEXICO WERE TWO YOUNG A nations just learning how to administer the vast territories wrestled from their former masters. The bloody but largely forgotten war they...
Documentary Films
Three days after Christmas in 1895, a fascinating new machine was unveiled in the basement of the Grand Cafe on Boulevard des Capuchins. The Paris crowd, there at a franc a ticket, found itself looking at pictures unlike any seen before-not just pictures,...
Margaret Sanger's "Deeds of Terrible Virtue"
I WOULD STRIKE OUT-I WOULD SCREAM FROM THE housetops. I would tell the world what was going on in the lives of these poor women. I would be heard. No matter what it should cost. I would be heard," wrote Margaret Sanger after one of her patients died...
"Risen from Our Blood and Tears"
IN 1756, AN eleven-year-old African boy named Olaudah Equiano was kidnapped by slavers and taken to their ship. "I was persuaded," he later wrote, "that I had gotten into a world of bad spirits. . when I looked around the ship and saw a copper pot boiling...
State by State
A roundup of activities of state humanities coucils across the country in September and October. ARIZONA An exhibition on the many roles of women from midwife to civil rights activist opens in October at the Hall of Fame Museum in Phoenix. "Making a...
The Canal Builders Who Disappeared
For four hmdrid years, the veins of an ancient system of irrigation canals lay buried beneath the Sonoran Desert in what is now Arizona. They were uncovered in 1865 when the U.S. Army established a base at Fort McDowell and found itself without water...
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