Humanities

Bimonthly magazine providing review of notable humanities projects and developments.

Articles from Vol. 22, No. 4, July/August

75 Years of Route 66
It was built in 1926, crossed eight states and three time zones, went from Chicago to Santa Monica, and was called "The Mother Road." Route 66 is not marked on most contemporary maps, but its influence on the road culture of the nation is still visible....
A Legacy of Art
Humanities goes on the road to take a look at a range of NEH-funded projects. In Oklahoma a woman works to save the Osage lanuage: in historically black colleges and universities nationwide, conservators are surveying and displaying art collections;...
A Roundup of Activities
Sponsored by State Humanities Councils ALABAMA Photographs of Alabama taken by Dorothea Lange, Walker Evans, Arthur Rothstein, and others under the auspices of the WPA are being shown at Northeast Alabama Community College in Rainsville. The seventytwo...
Editor's Note: An American Education
If education is the central experience of American life, attitudes toward that experience have varied substantially over the last two centuries. Educator Horace Mann, who traveled by horseback studying Massachusetts schools in the late nineteenth century,...
Fallout: Art and Design in the Atomic Age
After the dropping of the atomic bomb in 1945, America found itself caught between anxiety and optimism, not just in politics, but in art as well. The Atomic Age would see the plastics of wartime transformed into Tupperware cocktail shakers. The molded...
In Focus: Alice Smith Barkley: Making Voices Heard
FOR THE LAST TWENTY years, first as a volunteer and then as director, Alice Smith Barkley has been carving a new path for the North Carolina Humanities Council. Today the council embraces programs ranging from literacy for parents to oral history training...
Keeping a Language from Disappearing
For eighteen years, Carolyn Quintero has pored over each sound and syllable in the Osage language. She has recorded more than three hundred and fifty hours of interviews with Osage elders onto tape in order to develop an alphabet and rules of grammar....
Making Culture Visible
Why for a decade have the most advanced libraries been laying stock of photographs?" Charles Ammi Cutter, president of the Massachusetts Library Association, asked in 1900. "Why are we all now tumbling over one another out of eagerness to get photographs...
Making Movies from Shakespeare
Dozens of people run, walk, skate, or drive by, hardly glancing at the teenagers dressed in fifties attire reciting Shakespeare-loudly, at times-in the middle of Washington Park. Maybe over the years they've seen plenty of amateur filmmakers make use...
Partnerships
NEH and the Library of Congress A new opportunity for scholars to conduct research in the collections of the Library of Congress (LOC) was announced in June. The program will provide up to four joint awards through an NEH/LOC collaboration with an existing...
Pioneer Painters
"In the Fox River Settlement all was chaos and confusion during the early years of the colony," writes R.B. Anderson in 1895 in First Chapter. "Some of the Norwegians there were Quakers, others Baptists, others Presbyterians, others Lutherans, others...
Remembering World War II
HOUSTON STUDENTS INTERVIEW THEIR NEIGHBORS These veterans' memories of the Second World War are compelling. Listen to the story of the fourteen-year-old who convinced recruiters he was old enough to enlist and found himself a berth aboard a Nav) submarine...
The Great Experiment
A Film Journey with America's Public Schools THE MOST AMERICAN THING ABOUT AMERICA is its public school system, vice president Adlai Stevenson once said. For two hundred years, the public school has been a center of community interest, bringing people...
The Lone Star State: Conquers a New Frontier
Eighteen humanities councils are developing online encyclopedias with NEH support. Chairman William R. Ferris talks with Douglas E. Barnett of Texas, whose pioneering work on the NEW HANDBOOK OF TEXAS ONLINE has carved a new path. WILLIAM R. FERRIS:...
Wild Intellectuals and Exotic Folks
A small college in the mountains of North Carolina brought together some of the most innovative artists and thinkers of its time-Robert Motherwell and Buckminster Fuller and John Cage. Plagued by debts, the school sold off its land, cattle, and pianos...

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