Humanities

Bimonthly magazine providing review of notable humanities projects and developments.

Articles from Vol. 23, No. 4, July/August

Around the Nation
A Roundup of Activities Sponsored by the State Humanities Councils ARIZONA The Western television series and the image of Hispanics in early cinema will be the main topics of the second annual Tombstone Western Film Festival and Symposium. The event,...
Ben and Me
"I love detective work," says Claude-Anne Lopez; which is a good thing because she has been deciphering the papers of Benjamin Franklin since the project started nearly fifty years ago. Lopez's journey to the Franklin Papers began when she fled her native...
Beyond the Lightning
Ben Franklin not only experimented with electricity, but also charted the Gulf Stream and came up with the fire department, the lending library, and daylight saving time. By the age of forty-two, when Benjamin Franklin retired from the daily operations...
Editor's Note: "A Time Full of Shadows"
Since the September 11 attacks, historian David McCullough has been carrying a message across the country: Americans should look to their history. "Yes, this is a time full of shadows and fear," he says in a conversation with NEH Chairman Bruce Cole....
Inventing Tennessee Williams Letters 1920-1945
YEARS BEFORE THE GLASS MENAGERIE hit Broadway and Cat on a Hot Tin Roof was filmed with Paul Newman and Elizabeth Taylor, Thomas Lanier Williams roamed from city to city, drafting plays, taking up short-lived odd jobs, and writing hundreds of letters....
Old Houses Restored
The Shelburne Museum in Vermont will be renovating six historic houses with help from NEH. Founded in the 1950s by Electra Havemeyer Webb, the museum is a showcase for Webb's eclectic collection of antique Americana. Webb had the habit of acquiring early...
Our Man in Paris
How Benjamin Franklin Wooed the French Win Our War *t can be argued that if Benjamin Franklin had not gone to Paris in 1776, Americans might still speak with a British accent. By winning the hearts of the French people and the heads of the French court,...
The Danger of Historical Amnesia: A Conversation with David McCullough
A CONVERSATION with DAVID McCULLOUGH BRUCE COLE: There was a study done not too long ago that surveyed fifty of the elite colleges and universities. The students were asked questions taken from a high school curriculum, and the lack of historical knowledge...
The Illusionist: Mallarme and His Circle
The poems of Stephane Mallarme are known for an opacity that baffled even his peers. His friend Marcel Proust wrote, "How unfortunate that so gifted a man should become insane every time he takes up the pen." The painter Edgar Degas reputedly ran out...
Under the Big Top
FROM LATE JUNE UNTIL the last day in July, historians take time out of their classrooms to gather under a circus tent and reenact some of history's most interesting characters. Audiences come for magic. They come for community. Some even come for summer...
Working Together
IN THE AFTERMATH OF THE TERRORIST ATTACKS ON THE WORLD TRADE CENTER and the Pentagon on September 11, state humanities councils were on the spot to provide forums for coping with what had happened and strengthening their communities. Councils have been...
Your with Pomegranates: The Correspondence of Langston Hughes and Carl Van Vechten
LANGSTON HUGHES AND CARL VAN VECHTEN MET AT A benefit party in Harlem on the evening of November 10, 1924. "Kingston" was the name Van Vechten heard and recorded in his diary; maybe he was distracted by the commotion surrounding his new acquaintance....

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