Humanities

Bimonthly magazine providing review of notable humanities projects and developments.

Articles from Vol. 28, No. 6, November/December

American Arriviste
John Ledyard (1751 -1789) came to be one of the best known Americans of his time. Yet his life comprised a series of failures, increasingly grand, but failures all the same. As a young man, he slipped away from Dartmouth College in a canoe, his character...
Around the Nation
A Roundup of Activities Sponsored by the State Humanities CouncilsALABAMAJoan Didion's memoir Year of Magical Thinking is up for discussion at the Selma-Dallas County Public Library Nov. 6; on Nov. 14, authors Watt Key and Michael Knight will be at Spring...
Curio
MICKEY RAMPS IT UPFrom "Building America" on the National Building Museum's Web site: "The Car and Its Impact on the Built Environment: Disney Resort Guest Parking Garage, Anaheim, California."DESIGNED BY WOLF ARCHITECTS, Disney's new parking garage...
Editor's Note
A magazine should suggest to the reader the existence of a world outside one's door that is larger and more interesting than he or she would have imagined had they not read the magazine. A journalist I know put it this way, "I am grateful any time a...
Film as Argument
In his book A Personal Journey Through American Movies, director and tireless film preservation advocate Martin Scorsese describes a certain tendency in film authorship that arose after the adoption of production codes in the 1930s. Special-interest...
In Focus
Michael Gillette, Humanities TexasA visitor to Humanities Texas's new headquarters, in downtown Austin, is liable to get the grand tour from the council's director, Michael Gillette. The hundred-year-old Byrne-Reed House is encased in a sheath of modernizing...
Looking for Lincoln
A Conversation with Andrew FergusonJournalist Andrew Ferguson is widely admired as a writer's writer. Over the years, in magazines from the Weekly Standard to Reader's Digest to Time and beyond, he has proven himself to be one of the few genuine stylists...
Lost Children: Riders on the Orphan Train
"Dear Sisters, By the love of God be so kind as to take this poor orphan child and if she should die, please to bury her for me and I will be very happy.... I can't afford to bury her."THIS ANONYMOUS LETTER, ALONG WITH THE UNNAMED infant attached to...
Miami Swank AND ITS OPPOSITE
IN THE 1947 PROMOTIONAL PHOTO, a woman in a swimsuit-a bathing beauty, the caption said-reclines beneath her umbrella on Miami Beach, seemingly oblivious to the bulldozer about to crush her or, at least, carry her away. The image would be scary if it...
On Acting with the Lights On
JIM WARRENThe way he tells ft when he's auditioning actors, says Jim Warren, cofounder of the American Shakespeare Center and director of many of its productions, is "Shakespeare is the genius boy who has been shoved down our throats since day one of...
Shakespearetown
As Ralph Alan Cohen sits in his office at Mary Baldwin College in Staunton, Virginia, talking about how he thinks Shakespeare's plays should be acted and staged, his leisured Alabama drawl begins to turn rat-a-tat. A scholar of Shakespeare and the founder...
Teaching Rembrandt
WHY INTRODUCE CHILDREN TO MASTERPIECES?ON A SPRING MORNING, A SMALL CROWD OF CURIOUS, IF SLIGHTLY perplexed, middle school students stand looking at an artist's self-portrait. In the painting, the artist tells his story, warts and all. With its shimmering...
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