Humanities

Bimonthly magazine providing review of notable humanities projects and developments.

Articles from Vol. 30, No. 4, July/August

Ain't That the Truth
Webster's Third: The Most Controversial Dictionary in the English LanguageIn 1961 the new edition of an old and esteemed dictionary was released. The publisher courted publicity, noting the great expense ($3.5 million) and amount of work (757 editor...
Around the NATION
A Roundup of Activities Sponsored by the State Humanities CouncilsALABAMATimothy Buckner leads a teachers institute on "Slavery in Alabama: Public Amnesia and Historical Memory" at Troy University in Montgomery, June 28-July 3, and Gale Temple moderates...
Calendar
July/AugustPoets, novelists, and journalists who found work in the Depression with the Federal Writers' Project created a snapshot of the nation in those hard times, penning travel guides to each state, folklore collections, and oral histories from former...
Cultural Preservation
More than 150 American and Italian preservation professionals, ranging from physicists and chemists to curators and librarians, gathered at NEH in May to discuss how to preserve cultural heritage - whether it be Italian churches, Mississippi museums,...
Curio
GOOD STABLE MANNERSIn Ancient Rome and Modern America, NEH-funded scholar Margaret Malamud looks at the ways visions of the imperial city have been incorporated into everything from the Constitution to Caesar's Palace. In New York at the start of the...
Editor's Note
WHAT BOOKS ARE FORI have become a regular purchaser of old books, and as I pull these worn-out tomes from my mailbox I wonder if anyone else is still reading these particular works. One I recently bought is by a well-known writer, and its subject is...
Impertinent Questions WITH ALAN HOUSTON
AS A POLITICAL THEORIST. UC-SAN DIEGO PROFESSOR ALAN HOUSTON HAS DUG through the thicket of politics, philosophy, and personalities that shaped early modem England and colonial Amenca. His latest book, Benjamin Franklin and the Politics of Improvement,...
In Focus: Maryland's Phoebe Stein Davis
NOT TO BE BOASTFUL (AND SHE'S NOT), but Phoebe Stein Davis lays claim to a pretty spectacular humanities pedigree. She is kin to a seminal figure in twentieth-century modernism: Gertrude Stein, avantgarde prose stylist, art collector, and iconoclast...
Living off the Landscape
How Thomas Cole and Frederic Church Made Themselves at Home in the Hudson River ValleyACROSS THE BROAD RIVER valley, two houses stand witness. Though deserted long ago by the families that inhabited them, they have been meticulously restored and opened...
Proud Flesh: A Recollection of Wallace Stegner
When I came to Stanford in 1963 as a graduate student in English, Wallace Stegner ruled the roost. He had founded the Creative Writing Program and was a celebrated novelist and a master of nonfictional prose; he was widely known beyond the English department,...
Reading into the Great Depression
A Conversation with Morris DicksteinThere was more to the 1930s than Dorothea Lange photos and John Steinbeck novels. NEH-funded scholar and critic Morris Dickstein talks with Humanities about the decade's rival cliché and hidden gems. His new book,...
Swimming through Libraries
CALL ME ISHMAEL' is undoubtedly the most famous sentence of Herman Melville's Moby-Dick; but it is not, despite popular belief, the first - at least, not exactly. Between the novel's title page and Lshmael's self-introduction are two chapters of decidedly...
What IF?
To fully take in all the ways that the act of reading is changing in response to new technology, you would need to be a bit of a philosopher, have a sociologist's broad structural view, be conversant with economists and business people, be geeky enough,...
Who Said It?
Since first dipping a toe into its blue waters, man has been enchanted, challenged, and humbled by the sea. In this edition of Who Said It?, we ride the waves of literature and history to see what secrets the tides reveal.1. Alone, alone, all, all alone,Alone...