Humanities

Bimonthly magazine providing review of notable humanities projects and developments.

Articles from Vol. 26, No. 4, July/August

A Cultural Exchange
"We hope tonight is the start of a long-term effort that will promote a scholarly and cultural partnership between your country's storied past and ours," NEH Chairman Bruce Cole told Afghan President Hamid Karzai at an event held in the president's honor...
AMERICAN MODERNISTS: Breaking the Mold
In 1915, New York City was a city on the rise. Its skyscrapers soared higher than any other buildings in the world, manifesting the surging ambition of a young country that was transforming itself with technological prowess. Europe was at war while American...
A Roundup of Activities
Sponsored by the State Humanities CouncilsALABAMAA language immersion teacher institute, "Grand Tour IV: Language through Culture," will be held at Troy University from July 10 to 16. Another teacher institute, "Sunshine and Shadow: Comedy, Condemnation,...
Ernest Hemingway: One True Sentence
THEY WERE, perhaps, the greatest literary rivals of the twentieth century, brothers in self-destructive brilliance. F. Scott Fitzgerald came first, but Ernest Hemingway had the last word.In October 2001, the trustees of Hemingway's estate sent a fax...
Going to Cooperstown
The film has begun playing on PBS stations around the nation and will get monthly exposure this season at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. "A Celebration of the Minor Leagues," presented by Baseball America, takes place the first Friday...
Hemingway
He mourned the lost words more than anything. His wife-his first one, Hadley-packed the young writer's manuscripts, carbon copies and all, intending to surprise him in Lausanne. But the valise was stolen in a Paris train station. He would write about...
Life THROUGH Art's Prism
A CONVERSATION WITH PAUL JOHNSONWhen NEH Chairman Bruce Cole spoke recently with British writer Paul Johnson, the subject was Johnson's latest book, ART: A NEW HISTORY. He is the author of several other books on contemporary culture, among them HISTORY...
Remembering Emmett Till
ONA HOT AUGUST DAY FIFTY YEARS AGO, fourteen-year-old Emmett Till left his Chicago home to visit relatives in Mississippi. His mother was reluctant to let him go. The day before he was to board the southbound train, Mamie Till gave her son a lecture...
The Unconventional Willa Cather
From an early age, novelist Willa Gather was determined to be noticed by the world. At fourteen she shocked her hometown of Red Cloud, Nebraska, by masquerading as a boy. In college she became a feared cultural critic for the local newspaper. By her...
Time Travels
Time TravelsWhat would the world look like if Napoleon had won the Battle of Waterloo? Everyone in Brooklyn would be speaking French and eating goat cheese on their pizzas. To prevent this catastrophe, three ten-year-old buddies from Brooklyn-joe, Sam,...
WHITMAN'S LIFELONG ENDEAVOR: Leaves of Grass at 150
ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS ago, a little-known poet chose a small print house in Brooklyn to print his first book of poetry. He typeset ten pages or so of it himself. The poet was Walt Whitman and the book was Leaves of Grass.By the time of Whitman's...
Words and Art
"Art is the oldest thing in human society," the British writer Paul Johnson tells us. "Before we could express complicated things in words, we could do art."He continues: "That's an important thing-about our self-knowledge as a people, as a race, as...

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