Humanities

Bimonthly magazine providing review of notable humanities projects and developments.

Articles from Vol. 33, No. 2, March/April

2011 Medalists
Nine Who Have Shown the WayA builder of academic programs devoted to African-American Studies whose recent books have taken a broad look at history and philosophy. A celebrated poet and translator who has also been honored for his contributions to criticism....
A Century of Art
ARIZONA WHEN AFTER NEARLY FORTY-NINE YEARS AS A U.S. territory, Arizona became the 48th - and the last of the contiguous states- to enter the Union on Feb. 14, 1912, Arizona's first governor commissioned cowpunch-turned-artist Lon Megargee to create...
All the Art
THE RECORDS DIVISION AT THE FRICKRambling through the Frick Collection on East Seventieth Street in New York City, it's easy to be awed by what steel magnate Henry Clay Frick amassed during his lifetime. Towering, larger-than-life Van Dyck portraits...
Around the Nation
A Roundup of Activities Sponsored by the State Humanities CouncilsARIZONAThe Arizona Women's Heritage Trail hosts the Woman Suffrage Centennial Forum on March 9 at Prescott College Crossroads Center and at the Arizona Capitol Museum in Phoenix on March...
Calendar
Endowments-Supported EventsMarch/April"Children of the Plumed Serpent: The Legacy of Quetzalcoatl in Ancient Mexico" opens April 1 at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. The complexities of Mesoamerican societies that resisted Aztec and Spanish subjugation...
Curio
HOUSES OF SPIRITSTraversing southern Kentucky's byways, an unsuspecting motorist may happen upon a country cemetery with gabled sheds over a gravesite and its tombstone (see facing page). Other states have a few remaining grave houses, too, but many...
Editor's Note
We steer clear of current events and present-day politics in humanities magazine. We are unapologetically an oWspaper, yet we certainly try to run stories that shed light on how we arrived at the present moment. An essay in this issue reminds us of the...
Impertinent Questions WITH SANDRA SPANIER
WITH SANDRA SPANIERRead someone's mail? No. you would never do that, would you? But IQ would. For this edition, we're talking with Sandra Spanier, professor of English and general editor of the Hemingway Letters Project at Pennsylvania State University....
New Lives in New England
NEW HAMPSHIRE IMAGINE LEAVING YOUR HOME, QUICKLY, and with nothing, then crossing the border into Canada or Mexico, with no reason to believe you will return. It's almost unthinkable, of course: a true refugee crisis in the modern United States, but...
Reading the Sweet Trial
MICHIGAN ONE DAY IN THE SUMMER OF 1925, A DOCTOR bought a house on the east side of Detroit.Nothing particularly unusual, except the doctor was black, the house was in a white neighborhood, and in 1920s Detroit, as in many parts of the country, white...
RUSSIAN DREAMS of AN AMERICAN COLONY
FORT ROSSNorth of San Francisco, I am traveling along the isolated Sonoma coast from Bodega Bay to a place the Indians for thousands of years called Merini. Towering stands of redwoods rise up from the insteps of switchbacks on Highway One. The trees...
The Strange Politics of Gertrude Stein
Was the den mother of modernism a fascist?Why were so many prominent modernist writers and philosophers attracted to fascist or authoritarian regimes in the first half of the twentieth century? A list of those who were not - Samuel Beckett, James Joyce,...
Ungoverned Passion
IN OCTOBER 1794, GOUVERNEUR MORRIS PACKED UP HIS POSSESSIONS and turned the keys to his house, just outside Paris, over to a friend. Morris had lived in France since 1789, and had watched, first as a private citizen and then as the American minister...
Who Was Westbrook Pegler? the Original Right-Wing Takedown Artist
A CARTOON FROM THE 1940S PICTURES a formal dance party torn about by tuxedoed men yelling at each other, with a woman sitting in the center of the image saying, "All I did was mention Pegler!" She was referring to Westbrook Pegler, a syndicated newspaper...
Woman of the West
IDAHO KITTIE WILKINS, KNOWN AS THE HORSE QUEEN of Idaho, was perhaps the most famous western woman in the country at the turn of the twentieth century. The Wilkins Horse Company owned close to ten thousand horses in Owyhee County, Idaho, the largest...