Humanities

Bimonthly magazine providing review of notable humanities projects and developments.

Articles from Vol. 33, No. 4, July/August

Around the Nation
A Roundup of Activities Sponsored by the State Humanities CouncilsFLORIDA"Journey Stories," a Smithsonian Institution traveling exhibition, continues through July 7 at the Plant City Photo Archives and History Center. The exhibition then opens July 14...
Calendar
Endowment-Supported EventsThe "Plants and People of the Sonoran Desert Loop Trail," at the Desert Botanical Garden in Phoenix, covers five habitats that for two thousand years have yielded food, textile fiber, and medicine. Recently opened gardens feature...
Editor's Note
A question lingering in every issue of humanities is how we remember. It's a question of legacy, of how humanity's thoughts and words and deeds are recalled or forgotten by succeeding generations. Individuals ask to be remembered, but a writer may record...
Friends of Rousseau
WHEN I WAS FINISHING A BIOGRAPHY OF JEAN-JACQUES ROUSSEAU SOME YEARS AGO, I WAS STRUCK by the comment of someone who had known him: "The friends of Rousseau are as though related to each other through his soul, which has joined them across countries,...
Hawaiian Angle on Building
The architectural style most of us associate with Hawaii's built environment - hipped roofs, moon gates, and pagodas - began to make its appearance in Honolulu in the 1920s and '30s. Mirroring Hawaii's gentle climate and diverse natural life, it was...
Impertinent Questions WITH CHAD L. WILLIAMS
For this edition of IQ, we're shipping off to war with Chad L. Williams, associate professor of history at Hamilton College. Williams used an NEH-funded fellowship at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture to work on Torchbearers of Democracy:...
In Focus: Keira Amstutz of Indiana
WHEN KEIRAAMSTUTZTOOKTHE HELM AS PRESIDENT and CEO of Indiana Humanities in 2008, she brought a passion for the state's culture, Amstutz had previously served as chief counsel and director of policy for the City of Indianapolis. There she administered...
Into the Deep
NORTH CAROUNA IN THE SPRING OF 1942, SEAMAN RHODES Chamberlin was aboard the U.S.S. Roper the night it sank the U-85, fifteen miles off the coast of North Carolina's Outer Banks. Under the leadership of Lieutenant Commander Hamilton Howe, Chamberlin...
Jefferson Lecture in the Humanities 2012
ON APRIL 23, 2012, WRITER AND CONSERVATIONIST WENDELL BERRY delivered the forty-first Jefferson Lecture in the Humanities. The audience at the John E Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts was notably young and attentive, with many a twenty-something...
JULIEN GREEN: The End of A World
ON THE MORNING OF MAY 15, 1940, FIVE DAYS AFTER Germany invaded the Netherlands, Belgium, and France - and five days after Winston Churchill became prime minister of the United Kingdom - the French prime minister, Paul Reynaud, called his British ally...
Lessons from a Demigod
THE EPIC OF GILGAMESH HAS BEEN READ in the modern world for a little more than a century,and, in that time, this oldest of stories has become a classic college text. In my own courses on ancient literature and mythology, it is the book I always begin...
Let Us Now Praise James Agee
WHEN LIBRARYOFAMERICA published a collection of Pauline Kael's film writing last year, many of Kael's admirers fondly recalled her as the first writer to elevate film criticism to literature. But that distinction actually belongs to an earlier LOA author,...
Nietzsche Is Dead
COUNT HARRY KESSLER RECEIVED THE NEWS IN THE OFFICERS' MESS OF HIS ARMY REGIMENT FROM A FELLOW OFFICER GOING THROUGH DISPATCHES. ON OCTOBER 25, 1900, FRIEDRICH NIETZSCHE, WHO HAD FAMOUSLY ANNOUNCED THE DEATH OF GOD, HAD HIMSELF DIED.During the previous...
Noteworthy
DIGGING INTO DATAA new report - One Culture: Computationally Intensive Research in the Humanities and Social Sciences - written by the Council on Library and Information Resources assesses the lessons learned from the first round of NEH' s Digging into...
Penn's Woods Online
You'd think a guy with a name like Pudge Heffelfinger would have been mixed up in more than his share of schoolyard scuffles. Defending a Dickensian moniker like that, though, may have forged the gridiron talents that made him, in 1892, the first professionally...
Street Sense
MARYLAND ONE WAS A SOCIAL CRITIC WHO INSPIRED the term "muckraker." One launched an empire based entirely on promoting good manners. And another changed the hip-hop world forever. What could Upton Sinclair, Emily Post, and Tupac Shakur possibly have...
The Body of Christ
SACRED STREET THEATER IN MEDIEVAL ENGLANDDOOMSDAY, 1433. IN YORK, AFTER DARK.A red curtain. Painted stars. Actors in hoses, wigs, and two-faced masks - some in angel wings, some with trumpets. Wooden clouds and pieces of rainbow, and an iron frame with...
Thoreau on Flora
Henry David Thoreau's nineteenth-century observations of Concord's flora are proving useful to scientists studying twenty-first-century climate change. Richard Primack, a biology professor at Boston University, reported in the February 2012 issue of...
To See a Face
DELAWARE REFLECTING ON THE ARDUOUS PATH THAT brought him from poverty in rural Alabama to being one of the most successful and sought-after portrait painters in the country, the artist Simmie Knox once said, "Things that I thought were liabilities turned...
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