Humanities

Bimonthly magazine providing review of notable humanities projects and developments.

Articles from Vol. 34, No. 1, January/February

A Company Town
ALASKA NAMES SUCH AS GOLODOFF, Stepetin, Shaiashnikoff, Kudrin, Bereskin, Gromof, Galaktionof, Snigarof, Prokopiuf, Tutiakoff, Shelikov, Berikof, and Diakonof fill the pages of the ledger books of the Alaska Commercial Company that ran sea- otter hunting...
Around the Nation
A Roundup of Activities Sponsored by the State Humanities CouncilsARIZONAThe Superstition Mountain Museum in Apache Junction hosts the lecture "The History and Legend of the Lost Dutchman" on Jan. 3.The Arizona Historical Society's traveling exhibition...
Calendar
Endownment-Supported Events"Henry Ossawa Tanner: Modern Spirit" includes more than a hundred works by the modernist black painter who depicted many religious scenes from the Holy Land and North Africa. Born in Pittsburgh and raised in Philadelphia in...
Curio
TWO GENTLEMEN OF . . . CALCUTTA?The Parsis of Bombay were among the first in India - around 1850 - to adopt Western theater techniques and assemble troupes that performed throughout the subcontinent. Originally, the actors were all male, but by the 1870s...
Do-It-Yourself Language
ESPERANTO, KLINGON "OIRISH," AND OTHERSJOHN WALLTS IS ALL BUT FORGOTTEN except among historians and mathematicians, but he was a versatile intellectual force in the seventeenth century: an ecclesiast, academic administrator and man of affairs, scientist...
Editor's Note
Recently, a young African-American reader told me she did not see herself in the covers of HUMANITIES. She was talking mainly about the magazine's coverage of European culture, which she assumed is always about white people. I say this not to criticize....
Faces of the Renaissance
When you stare into the eyes of Old Master portraits, who is it that stares back? You may be surprised at how familiar these Renaissance-era faces are. That's the point of the exhibition "Revealing the African Presence in Renaissance Europe" at Baltimore's...
From Cartoons to Conservation
JAY "DING" DARLING WAS OFTEN REFERRED TO AS best friend a duck ever had." Although known during lifetime as a nationally syndicated editorial cartoonist for Des Moines Register - producing more than 15,000 carover fifty years - Darling's most lasting...
Impertinent Questions
Make sure your counterfeit identity papers are in order, because for this edition of IQ, we are signing up with the Office of Strategic Services (OSS) for a daring midnight operation under the Aegean sky. Susan Heuck Allen's Classical Spies: American...
LONG LIVE Sherlock Holmes
WASHINGTON IT'S 1903, AND SHERLOCK HOLMES, most famous consulting detective, retires at age forty-nine to become a beekeeper on his small farm on the Sussex Downs. Except for an adventure infiltrating a German spy ring and an investigation into the mysterious...
LOOKING FOR THE TRUTH in Utah
In 1985, Utah Technical College had an enrollment of a few thousand students and general education courses that students took to get out of the way. Today, the school has become Utah Valley University, one of the largest public institutions of higher...
Panel of Experts
Three distinguished artists have been selected to judge submissions to NEH's competition for a new National Humanities Medal.George R. Anthonisen is a figurative sculptor in Bucks County, Pennsylvania. His works are in the permanent collections of the...
Pox in the City
Not malaria. Not cholera. Not AIDS, influenza, measles, or tuberculosis. Not even bubonic plague. No disease in history has destroyed more lives than the "speckled monster," smallpox.The pattern repeated itself in every empire: Egyptian, Hittite, Greek,...
Shakespeare IN 6 PARTS
THERE OUGHT TO BE A CHANNEL called BBC America Classic. Just in time for Shakespeare's birthday this April, it could broadcast a marathon called "The Bard on the Beeb." I picture them running the storied Hamlet at Elsinore, filmed on location at Kronborg...
The Agitator WILLIAM LLOYD GARRISON and the Abolitionists
On July 4, 1854, William Lloyd Garrison set fire to a copy of the U.S. Constitution. "A covenant with death," he called it, "and an agreement with hell." Hoiding theburning parchment above his head, he repeated forcefully a psalmic rouse to the hundreds...
The Mysterious MISS AUSTEN
In May 1813, JANE AUSTEN MINGLED AMONG LONDON'S FASHIONABLE CROWD AS she took in an exhibition of oils and watercolors at Wigley's Great Room at Spring Gardens. Since the beginning of the year, the "ton" had been chattering about and passing around a...
The Wreck of the REFORMATION
FLORIDA JONATHAN DICKINSON'S JOURNAL, FIRST published in 1699, is a harrowing narrative of shipwreck and captivity on a stretch of Florida's Atlantic coast well outside of Spanish control and seldom seen by any English speaker, much less a Quaker merchant...
Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.